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Painting by Hockwell Kent 



Ike HOME DECORATOR 




Painling i"J Rockwell Kent 



Front Cover: BODY, SWP Outside Gloss White. SHUTTERS, 
S-W Trimbrite Verdas Green Light. 



Above. BODY, SWP Primrose Yellovr. TRIM, SWP Gloss 
White. SHUTTERS, S-W Trirabrile Verdas Green Dark. 



NDEX 



Living Rooms .... 6-40 

Dining Room ...... 7 

Breakfast Nooks . . 8-38 

Kitchens 8-9-21 

Bathrooms . . . 10-19-21 

Bedrooms 22-31 

Small Furniture .... 20 
Houses (Frame) 1-2-32 to 35 
Houses (Stucco-Brick) 36-37 



Recreation Room 
Nursery . . . . 
Porches (Sun, etc. 
Sleeping Porch . 
Halls, Doors . . 
Barn 



. 38 
. 22 

34-39 
. 34 
8-38 
. 39 



Copyright 193C The S-W Co. 



Printed in U.S.A. 




BEAUn AND PROTECTION * 



b 



y 



S H E R w I N - Williams 



» Few things can give you the pleasure that 
comes from the use of good paint. Your walls 
and woodwork become warm and friendly 
— almost animated— when your decorator 
dips his brush into Sherwin-Williams Paint. 

» Painting is fascinating — intriguing to 
watch and to anticipate the final beauty on 
the big jobs where painting is done by a 
master painter — thrilling to feel the flow of 
color and new beauty created by the brush 
in your own hand as you give the new lease 
of life to some dingy chair, bed or knick-knack. 

» And a can of paint — with a Sherwin- 
Williams label around it — is an indispens- 
able part of your home's beauty and protec- 
tion. Think what you can do with a brush 
and S-W Semi-Lustre in your kitchen and 
bathroom. Think how you can paint light 
and happiness into the surroundings that 
become as much a part of you as your name. 



Think how you can create the atmosphere 
of home — your home — because it reflects 
the charm and personality that your friends 
recognize as yours. 

» "All you need to know about paint" is 
the Sherwin-Williams label and the Sherwin- 
Williams name. Here is provided all you 
will ever need in paint. The finish that will 
give you the greatest measure of Beauty 
and Protection has been designed and per- 
fected by the world's greatest staff of paint 
engineers. It has been made simple and 
easy to use. It has been made so safe cind 
dependable that you buy a Sherwin-Williams 
finish — with its famous "Cover the Earth" 
trademark — anywhere in the world with 
complete confidence. 

» We have a complete stock of Sherwin- 
Williams finishes in our store, ready to 
serve you. 



[3] 



see easier 



PAINT.../0 

rAI N I . . .jjor happier homes 



PAINT FDR LIGHT.. 

as well as for DECORATION 



» In selecting the colors for painting various rooms in the home 
it is important to bear in mind that the lighter colors have the 
higher light reflection values. Their use, therefore, contributes to 
better lighting, particularly when used on ceilings. 

With lighter tints on ceilings, it becomes possible to use selec- 
tions from a wide range of shades for the decoration of walls and 
woodwork. In fact, for satisfactory seeing conditions, walls done 
in a lower key are usually preferable to a decorative scheme com- 
posed wholly of very light tints. The explanation is that with ample 
light diffused by sight-saving lamps and modern lighting fixtures 

and reflected by a light tinted ceiling— the eyes find the deeper 

shades of walls comfortable and pleasing. 

In rooms with considerable areas of woodwork — rooms with 
several doors, cupboards or bookshelves — the woodwork should 
be done in lighter tones— in living rooms stains, such as honey 
maple, silver gray, fumed oak or even ivory or white enamel. 

Kitchens have a great deal of woodwork. By doing the panels 
of the cupboards and doors in S-W Enameloid of approximately 
the same light tint as the walls and by using harmonizing tints for 

Come to our store for information about Sherwin-Williams Products. 

[4] 





• Even bright sunshine cannot penetrate far into a room with 
dingy walls and ceihngs like these. This is most unfortunate 
because as we get older our eyes require more light lor com- 
fortable reading or sewing. Eyestrain has a bad effect upon 
health and a gloomy room is not only depressing upon the ones 
living there but is responsible for many preventable accidents. 

HOW MUCH LIGHT 




WHITE 
89% 



IVORY 

82% 



CANARY 
YELLOW 



n% 



CRE^M 
77% 



SKY BLUE 
65% 





PALE GREEN 
59% 



SHELL PINK BRIGHT 

55% SAGE 

52% 

In selecting colors for the ceiling and walls of Q room, with a view to having 
proper seeing conditions, it is necessary to know how much hght each color 




• What a difference puuitud walla and ceilings can make! Soff, 
pleasing light is carried to the farthest corner of this room. It 
is easy to read or sew anywhere in it. Flat-Tone Ivory Ceilings 
are light-saving ceilings. Its velvety, non-glare surface is ideally 
suited to diffuse light — it is kind to your eyes. Before painting 
this room, the sight meter registered only 1 or 2 foot-candles 
Alter painting it showed 12 fool-candles all over the room. 

EACH COLOR REFLECTS 





CAEN 


ORCHrD 


CREAM 


IVORY 


STONE 


67% 


GRAY 


TAN 


76%, 




66% 


66% 




SILVER OLIVE FOREST COCOANUT 

GRAY TAN GREEN BROWN 

46% 43% 22% 16% 

reflects. This chart gives the light reflection value of various colors in terms 

of the percentage of light each color reflects. 



BLACK 

2% 



trimming the frames and window casings, you not only obtain 
better seeing conditions but the room will seem larger and more 
convenient. 

In the kitchen, one should be able to read recipes with accuracy 
and ease, to examine pots, pans, dishes and cutlery for spotless 
cleanness and to use sharp knives and to work at the stove with 
perfect safety. Therefore, light-colored, washable paint is indis- 
pensable for all kitchen wall and woodwork surfaces. 

In the laundry, particularly the basement laundry, make the 
most of daylight from windows which are usually small, by paint- 
ing walls white. Ceilings should be plastered or sealed with wall 
board and painted white, also. 

In the sewing room, where the work is most exacting on the 
eyes, ideal seeing conditions are obtained through the combina- 
tion of ample illumination, white or a light tint on the ceiling and 
a restful wall color — as low a light reflection value as Bright Sage 
52% or Olive Tan 43% is permissible. 

In the living room, dining room, hall and study, color and style 
of decoration are important. In order to bring out full beauty of 
the furnishings a relatively high level of general illumination is 
essential. Both natural daylight and artificial light are diffused 
throughout the room better when light colored ceiling tints are 
employed. And when this is done one is free to employ deeper, 
richer wall colorings as desired. 



The color chart reproduced here will be found very interesting and in- 
structive. The range of color extends from v^hite through the tints used for 
wall painting, down to black. With each tint is shown the percentage of 
light it reflects. The tints showing above 70% light reflection value make 
excellent ceiling colors because they make rooms easier to see in — easier 
to read in, easier to perform any task in using the eyes. In rooms employing 
wall colors such as Cocoanut Brown or Forest Green it is most important 
to "make up" for darker wall tints by employing light tints for the ceiling 
with their greater light reflection values. 



Come to our store for information about Sherwin-Williams Products. 

[5] 




new' 


^m ORS INVADE 




THE 


LIVING ROOM 



» Richer wall colors are now commanding atten- 
tion for living rooms — shades like Forest Green, 
Cocoanut Brown and Olive Tan. The reason is 
greater eye comfort, a more intimate, cozy room 
and an easier background to display room furnish- 
ings. The room is "sky-Hghted" by painting the 
ceiling in near-white, Cream Gray or Ivory White 
which diffuses light throughout the room where it 
does you the most good — onto the things you look 
at. It is like looking at a garden with a background 
of evergreens. 

If your floors are dark, light toned spot rugs will 
provide the needed tie-up and balance with Hght 
ceiling and light woodwork. You should include 




some pieces of light upholstery and group the 
pieces— a table, a chair, a lamp— for color variety, 
accenting with a painted book rack, a hand deco- 
rated vase or other useful accessories i^i color. 



CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone While. WALL, S-W Flat-Tone Forest 
Green. WOODWOHK, S-W Old Dutch Enamel White. 






[6] 




AND NOW 


WE HAVE 




COLORED 


CEILINGS 



» Here is a variation from the usual way of 
decorating: Have the walls done in a light neu- 
tral gray, then put the "room color" on the 
ceiling. Use a deep, rich color for enameling or 
carpeting the floor and let woodwork and fur- 
niture carry the accent color. Of course, when 
the ceiling is dark, it is essential to have the 
walls very light because they must diffuse light 
throughout the room — the function usually per- 
formed by a white or a light colored ceiling. 
Lighting of rooms decorated in this way is accom- 
plished with modern 
"sight-saving" floor 
and table lamps for 
easy reading. The ef- 
fect of colored ceil- 
ings is a rich glow of 
subdued color under 
artificial light. With 
different colored ceil- 
ings adjoining rooms 
can have the same 
colored walls and still 
be individual. 

The drcpery rods 
extend past the win- 
dow casings. Draper- 
ies thus hang over 
wall space rather than over the windows. In this 
way one can easily give narrow windows a Wider 
appearance. 





It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 



[7] 



Dining Room: CEILING, S-W Flat -Tone mixture, 2 parts. S-W 
Flat-Tone Cream to 1 part S-W Flat-Tone Shell Pink. WALL, S-W 
Flat-Tone Cream Gray. WOODWORK, S-W Enameloid Jade. 




Above: CEILING AND UPPER WALL OF KITCHEN, 
S-W Semi-Luslie White. WALLS OF BREAKFAST 
NOOK, S-W Semi-Lustre Pale Green. WOOD TRIM, 
S-W Enameloid lade. 



Right: CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone Cream. WALLS, Flat- 
Tone Buff sponge stippled with Cream. WOODWORK, 
Enameloid Old Ivory striped with Chinese Red. 



KITCHENS FOR EVERY TASTE 



» When you see a clever kitchen which ex- 
cites your envy, don't give up and say, '1 
couldn't ever accomplish anything like that 
in my house." Because if color can do it, you 
can have your wish fulfilled completely and 
economically — the Sherwin-Williams way. 
Just see what color has done for these simple, 
unpretentious kitchens. Each color is made to 
help the other. When you have attractive 
color contrasts hke these, walls and wood- 
work are ever so much easier to keep looking 
well than in the monotonous all-white kitchen. 



Come to our store for information about Sherwin-Williams Products. 



18] 




Parts that fingermark are done in the 
darker trim color. See how soft green covers 
the service portions around the sink in the 
kitchen to the left, but observe, also, how 
generously white is used on ceilings and 
walls to diffuse light and thus make it easier 
to work. 

In the kitchen below white walls and ceil- 
ings make seeing easier while the soft warm 
iaupe on woodwork is restful and ever so 
cheering on dull rainy days. In the breakfast 
room, below, the plain walls are patterned 
by sponge stippling-so easy and so much 
fun to do. Washable finishes make work eas- 
ler and inspiring colors in Enameloid and 
Semi-Lustre keep you feeling fit because you 
don t tire quickly in happy surroundings. 







^111 



u 




TRIMMING IN COLOR 



EASY TO DO . . . 



» Nothing adds to the attractiveness of a 
kitchen cabinet as does the finishing 
stripe or applied design one admires in 
"professional" work. It is the necktie of 
the ensemble, so to speak. When decorat- 
ing anything in color consult the Enamel- 
oid Color Card we have at your disposal. 
Here you will find color suggestions for 
trimming all Enameloid Colors. It is so 
easy to do the edges of tables and chairs, 
also the mouldings of cabinet doors when 
you use the right kind of inexpensive 
trimming brush. Use of the correct trim- 
ming color is the mark of the artist and it 
doubles your enjoyment of your own 
handiwork. 

Sherwin-Williams artists have selected 
these color combinations for you, we 
have their recommendations here and 
will gladly show you how. Even if you 
are a novice you can do your breakfast 
room set, have fun doing it, and turn out 
a job of decorating that you will enjoy 
for a long time. 



Above: CEILING, S-W Semi-Lustre Mixture of Buii 
and Light Pink, equal parts WALLS, S-W Semi-Lustre 
ivory White. WOODWORK, S-W Enameloid French 
Gray. 



Left: CEILING AND WALLS, S-W Semi-Lustre White. 
WOODWORK, S-W Enameloid Taupe trimmed with 
S-W Enameloid Chinese Red. FLOOR, Linoleum or 
S-W Floor Enamel Mahogany. 



9] 



Parts that fingermark are done in the 
darker trim color. See how soft green covers 
the service portions around the sink in the 
kitchen to the left, but observe, also, how 
generously white is used on ceilings and 
walls to diffuse light and thus make it easier 
to work. 

In the kitchen below white walls and ceil- 
ings make seeing easier while the soft warm 
Taupe on woodwork is restful and ever so 
cheering on dull rainy days. In the breakfast 
room, below, the plain walls are patterned 
by sponge stippling — so easy and so much 
fun to do. Washable finishes make work eas- 
ier and inspiring colors in Enameloid and 
Semi-Lustre keep you feeling fit because you 
don't tire quickly in happy surroundings. 





TRIMMING IN COLOR 



EASY TO DO . . . 



» Nothing adds to the attractiveness of a 
kitchen cabinet as does the finishing 
stripe or applied design one admires in 
^'professional" work. It is the necktie of 
the ensemble, so to speak. When decorat- 
ing anything in color consult the Enamel- 
oid Color Card we have at your disposal. 
Here you will find color suggestions for 
trimming all Enameloid Colors. It is so 
easy to do the edges of tables and chairs, 
also the mouldings of cabinet doors when 
you use the right kind of inexpensive 
trimming brush. Use of the correct trim- 
ming color is the mark of the artist and it 
doubles your enjoyment of your own 
handiwork. 

Sherwin-Williams artists have selected 
these color combinations for you, we 
have their recommendations here and 
will gladly show you how. Even if you 
are a novice you can do your breakfast 
room set, have fun doing it, and turn out 
a job of decorating that you will efijoy 
for a long time. 



Above: CEILING, S-W Serai-Lustre Mixture o£ Buff 
and Light Pink, equal parts WALLS, S-W Semi-Lustre 
Ivory White. WOODWORK, S-W Enameloid French 
Gray. 



Left: CEILING AND WALLS, S-W Semi-Lustre White. 
WOODWORK, S-W Enameloid Taupe trimmed with 
S-W Enameloid Chinese Red. FLOOR, Linoleum or 
S-W Floor Enamel Mahogany. 



[9] 



o^ colorful 
bathroom like 
this brightens 
the home , , . 





Above: CEILING AND DROP, S-W Semi-Lustre mixture of 
Pale Green and White, equal parts. WALLS, S-W Enam- 
eloid Old Ivory. WOOD TRIM, S-W Enameloid Taupe. 
TUB RECESS, S-W Enameloid Apricot. 



Lower Left: CEILING AND WALLS, Semi-Lustre White. 
WOODWORK, Enameloid Platinum. DADO, Enameloid 
Jade and Platinum, mixed equal parts. Stencil No. 7, 



[10] 



It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 



FINDING THE BATH^ 



ROOM COLOR SCHEME 



» First, shop around for the shower 
curtain that appeals to your fancy. The 
new rubberized silk curtains come in 
gorgeous colors. The one you select 
will become the keynote of your color 
scheme. Paint the walls in a light con- 
trasting tint, trimming the woodwork 
and enameling the floor (if it is of wood 
or worn linoleum) in strong accent 
colors. Remember that white fixtures 
always look better with colored walls, 
as you will see in the ritzy little bath- 
room on page 19. And, if yours are the 
new colored fixtures, observe, in the 
modernized bathroom to the left, how a 
softly contrasting tint adds to their rich- 
ness. Here, the green fixtures suggested 
the tint of Pale Green Semi-Lustre that 
is so distinguishing for the ceiling. The 
Enameloid Black floor is decidedly 
smart. The striping with Enameloid 
Platinum "makes" the room. 

Paint your bathroom for the beauty of 
color. But paint it also for the satisfac- 
tion that absolute cleanness gives! To 
be truly immaculate let every inch of 
your walls and woodwork be just as 
germ-proof and easily cleaned as the 
dishes on your table. With Enameloid 
and Semi-Lustre you can knqw that 
you are safe. Sherwin-Williams paint 
engineers have developed these fin- 
ishes so that their films are so washable 
that even mercurochrome washes off 
clean with soap and water. Isn't that 
worthwhile? 




OUR STORE IS SHERWIN-WILLIAMS'PAINT HEADQUARTERS 



SHEkWIN-WlLLIAMS BUDGET PAYMENT PLAN' 

PAINT NOW-PAY LATER 

There is no need for delaying the needed pointing or redecorating 
in your home. This can be done nou/ and you can pay for it in con- 
venient monthly payments over a twelve or eighteen-month period. 
No down payment required. Our plan includes material and labor. 
You may have the work done by the painter who has been handling 
your work previously or we can recommend good craftsmen to you. 
The cost of the Budget Payment Plan is low — regular F. H, A. rates. 
With this Uberal plan available there is no need to deny your family 
the satisfaction and pride of living in a well painted and decorated 
home. Don't forget that a good paint job not only enhances the value 
of the property but protects it against decay and rapid depreciation. 
Come in and let us explain the details of this plan to you. 



BRIEF SUMMARY OF ADVANTAGES 

• No Down-Payment Required 

• Up to Eighteen Months to Pay 

• Installments as Low as $4.19 Monthly 

• Smallest Amount Financed $70.00 
•• Largest Amount Financed $50,000 

• First Payment Due One Month from Date of 

Completion 

• The Low National Housing Act Interest Rates 

• No Red Tape 

• Good Workmanship Required 



ir TABLE OF COKTENTS ^ 

WOODWORK Stippled and Textured 

Different Ways to Finish 13 Finishes 23 

Preparing New Woodwork 1 3 Water Paints— Interior— 

What Varnish to Use . 13 Exterior 25 

Applying Stain . . 13 EXTERIOR SURF ACES 

btain and Varnish m 

One Operation . . 14 House Painting— How 

Dull-rubbed Finish . . 14 Often 26 

Enamehng Woodwork . 14 What Season Best for 

Removing Old Finish . 14 Outside Painting . . 26 

ma ^ ^ n <• How to Select House Paint 

f'-*^*^'*^ Colors ..... 26 

To Refinish Old Floors . 15 How Many Coats . . . 26 

Linoleum Finishing . . 15 How to Estimate Quantity 

How to Wax Floors . . 15 of Paint 26 

Enamehng Floors . 15-16 Valuable Painting Hints 27 

FURNITURE How to Use SWP . . 27 

Staining New Unfinished Brushes for House 

Furniture .... 13 Painting 28 

Different Tinpes of Finishes 16 Staining Wood Shingles. 28 

Refinishing Old Furniture 16 Metal Roofs — ^to Paint . 28 

New Unfinished Furniture 1 7 Shingle Roofs — to Paint . 29 

Wicker Furniture ... 17 Composition Roofs — \o 

How to Trim Furniture . 1 7 Paint .29 

INTERIOR SURFACES Patching Holes-Gutters, 

Kinds of Walls to Paint . 18 „, t,' . ', ' \A ' 

„ . . -^ , ,_ Stucco, Brick, and Con- 

Repainng Cracks . . 18 crete Houses ... 29 

Wall Boards — to Point .18 -, , « i. -n ■ l nn 

T^ . /-SI 1 TAT n r Porch Floors — to Paint . Ju 

Preparing Old Walls for ^^^^^ Ceilings-to Poiftt 

Painfang .... 18 —to Varnish 30 

Kalsomined Walls . . 18 a ' ^-^n 

WaUpapered WaUs . . 18 Screens-to Paint . . 30 

latchens. Bathrooms, ^arns, Outbuildings, 

Laundry 23 Fences — ^to Paint . . 30 

Living Rooms, Bedrooms, Metal Fences, Roofs — to 

Dining Rooms ... 23 Paint ...... 30 



H 



H 



WAY 



I K I 



H 



IN HOW MANY WAYS CAN 
WOODWORK BE FINISHED? 

New unfinislied woodwork can be left 
in its natural color or it can be 
stained, which usually emphasizes 
the figure of the groin as well as 
changing its color. It can then be 
varnished in either a glossy or a dull 
varnish or a wax finish may be applied. 
Woodwork may also be finished in either 
Q glossy or a dull enamel finish. 
Wood which has good natural grain 
is usually finished by staining and 
varnishing — the varnish coat serving 
both to protect the surface and to en- 
hance its beauty. Stained and varnished 
woodwork is always in good taste, 
although, in small rooms, or where the 
wood grain is not attractive, painting 
or enameling the woodwork in a tone 
close to that of the walls will moke the 
room appear larger. 



HOW TO PREPARE NEW 
WOODWORK 

Sandpaper the wood smooth — sand- 
paper with the grain, never across the 
grain. The final 
finish can be no 
smoother or bet- 
ter than the sur- 
face on which it 
is applied. If the 
wood is rough, 
sondpaper first 
with No, paper 
and finish with 
No. 00. The wood 
must be dry^ — 
and must be kept 
dry. 



HOW TO APPLY STAIN 

(These instructions apply to staining 

new unfinished furniture, also) 

Use S-W Woodcraft Stains which are 



* WOODWORK * 





modified into many 



made for new, 
unfinished wood. 
(See Flo-Lac for 
staining wood 
surfaces already 
finished) Wood- 
craft Stains are 
furnished in 
eight popular 
shades which in 
turn can be 
variations 



plained in the color card at oiu store. 
These stains hove the advantages of 
(1) not raising the grain of the wood 
and (2) of spreading without streaking. 
Stir the contents of the can thor- 
oughly and apply the stain with a 
S-W No. 710 Brush. It is advisable 
to have your painter stain a scrap piece 
of the woodwork before proceeding 
vrith the job. If too dark, Woodcraft 
Stain Reducer may be added to make 
the stain lighter. After the stain is applied 
it may be wiped lightly with a soft cloth, 
which brightens the flake or highhghtg 
of the wood. Wiping also enables the 
painter to overcome inequalities in 
different pieces of wood where the stain 
would otherwise "take" deeper. 

• 

OPEN GRAIN WOOD 

Woods such as oak, walnut, chestnut 
and mahogany contain open pores 
which require filling with S-W Paste 
Wood Filler in order to make the surface 
level and prevent the varnish from 
sinking in and resulting in an uneven 
effect. 

Paste Wood Filler is applied, according 
to directions on the can, after the wood 
has been stained and must dry 48 hours 
before varnishing. 



Close grain woods such as pine, maple, 
birch, etc., need no filler — do not use a 
so-called "Uquid filler" or firstcoater. 



HOW TO USE PASTE 
WOOD FILLER 

Thin to a creamy consistency with 
benzine. Select the color of filler specified 
for the stain being used. Frequently a 
dark colored fUler is applied to the wood 
without first staining it, when only a 
sUght darkening is wanted. Paste" Wood 
Filler comes also in a "Naturcd" shade 
for floors or woodwork not to be stained. 

Use a S-W No. 227 or No. 40 Brush and 
apply the thinned filler over a few square 
feet at a time and let it become partially 
"set," indicated by the gloss dying 
down — in about 10-20 minutes. Then 
wipe off by rubbing across the grain 
with a piece of burlap or coarse cloth. 
This is intended to leave the filler only 
in the pores of the wood. Wipe clean 
and let dry for 24-48 hours before 
proceeding. 



^^ / ^^^^HsB^^^ 


J-^ — ^^ ^- 


1^ 


-^^^ 







Brush filler, working well into the wood. 
Wipe filler off across grain of wood. 



SPECIAL NOTE: 

Woodwork that has been stained must 
be given a coat of thin white shellac — 
S-W Pure White Shellac thinned with 
an equal amount of denatured alcohol — 
before applying the varnish coat. This 
is to prevent the s'ain "bleeding" into 
the varnish which not only would dis- 
figure the finish but interfere with 
proper drying and durability of the 
varnish. 

Woodcraft Maples stain is recommended 
to be given a sealing coat of S-W 
Orange Shellac. 



WHAT VARNISH TO USE 

For best results use two coats of Sherwin- 
WiUiams Mar-Not Varnish. Thiff dries 
with a full rich gloss and is the most 
durable satisfactory finish for aU interior 
surfaces. If a dull-rubbed finish is 
desired this is accomplished by letting 
the varnish dry for 48 hours when it is 
rubbed with powdered pumice stone and 
oil (see page 17). S-W Velvet Finish 
Varnish may be applied as a final coat 
over Mar-Not Varnish if a dull-drying 
finish is preferred vathout hand rubbing. 



KOW TO APPLY VARNISH 

Use S-W No. 220 Brush 2 inches wide 
for average jobs. Work with a full brush 
aiming to spread the varnish as freely 
as possible without its running or 
sagging. Brush tvifb the grain of the 
wood covering about 4 or 5 boards 
(floor) for a distance of about 4 feet. 
Then, without filling the brush "cross 
off" the surface to catch any places 
missed. Now scrape the brush over the 
edge of the can and lightly "straighten 
out" the surface, brushing lengthwise 
again. Brushing thus in three directions 
spreads the varnish to a uniform lull 
film without danger of runs. 



For best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



[13] 



Alter varnish is applied, avoid moving 
about in any way that will stir up dust. 
A clear dry day promotes rapid, normal 
drying. Same methods cover varnishing 
of woodwork and furniture 



(1) Flow it 
on with 
the grain 
— using a 
full brush. 




HOW TO STAIN AND VARNISH 
IN ONE OPERATION 

If the old varnish is in fairly good shape 
except that the color needs freshening 
up, simply wash clean with Flaxoap and 
water, dry and sandpaper to a smooth 
duU surface with No. 00 paper. Wipe 
thoroughly with turpentine if surface 
has been waxed. 

Apply one or two coats of Sherwin- 
Williams Flo-Lac in the desired color, 
according to the depth of color required. 
As a final finish, apply a coat of Mar-Not 
Varnish for a glossy finish and Velvet 
Finish Varnish for a didl ftnish. 



FLO-LAC REFINISHING SYSTEM 

Old floors and woodwork frequently 
are so badly discolored and marred 
that they will not permit ordinary re- 
finishing. Wash such surfaces clean 
vrith S-W Flaxoap and water. Rinse 
well and dry. Sandpaper all rough spots 
and apply 2 coats of S-W Flo-Lac Ground 
color which will hide the old surface 
and give a new foundation. Then apply 
two coats of Flo-Lac in the desired color; 
it comes in six popular wood colors, 
ready for use. 



TO SECURE DULL-RUBBED 
EFFECT WITHOUT RUBBING 

Apply a finishing coat of S-W Velvet 
Finish No. 1044. This varnish dries to a 
beautiful dull finish closely resembling 
the handrubbed finish. It has one ad- 
vantage over handrubbing in that it 
produces a dull finish over places which 
would be very difficult to rub by hand. 



TO FINISH WOODWORK 
IN ENAMEL OR PAINT 

The secret to beautiful, smooth, tile-like 
enamel finishing is a surface that has 
been sandpapered smooth and then 



finished with a good quality enamel 
undercoater. It takes more effort, more 
time, more material — but it's worth it. 



TO REMOVE AN OLD FINISH 

If the old finish is cracked, chipping 
and badly worn, remove it entirely with 
Sherwin-Williams Taxite. Toxite does 
not discolor or burn the wood, does not 
raise the grain or otherwise harm wood, 
loosen veneers, etc., as do caustic prep- 
arations which are also dangerous to 
the hands. 

Apply Taxite, let stand for q few minutes 
until the old finish is softened and scrape 
off with a putty knife. Scrub clean vrith a 
brush dipped in Taxite and wash 
thoroughly with turpentine (Varnish 
will not dry if Taxite is not washed off 
clean) then proceed as instructed for 
new work. 



NEW UNFINISHED WOOD — 
TO ENAMEL 

Sandpaper until perfectly smooth, fin- 
ishing with No. 00 paper. Dust carefully. 
Apply a priming coat of Sherwin-WiUiams 
Flat-Rite Enamel Undercoater, thinned 
with one quart raw linseed oil and )/^ 
pint S-W Exolvent or turpentine to the 
gallon of undercoater. When this prim- 
ing coat is dry (over night) fill cracks 
and nail holes with a white lead putty 
and sandpaper the entire surface 
lightly vrith No. 00 sandpaper. 

Second Coat. Use Flat-Rite thinned 
with one pint S-W Exolvent or turpentine 
to the gallon. Sandpaper lightly with 
No. 00 sandpaper. 

Third Coat. Apply an equal-part 
mixture of S-W Enameloid and Flat-Rite. 
Thin this mixture with one pint of S-W 
Exolvent or turpentine to the gallon. 

Fourth Coat. Apply S-W Enameloid 
as it comes in the can. 

NOTE: For three-coat work: same as 
above except omit second coat. 



OLD VARNISHED OR 
ENAMELED WOODWORK TO 
FINISH WITH ENAMELOID 

If the old finish is badly cracked it 
should be removed with Sherwin- 
Williams Taxite — as directed. Then pro- 
ceed as directed for new surfaces. 

Ordinarily the surface merely needs 
cleaning to remove dirt and grease, 
then rubbing with No. sandpaper to 
dull whatever gloss there may be — ■ 
otherwise, enamel finishes apphed over 
old, hard, shiny finishes will give trouble 
with chipping off later on. 

Touch up bare spots with S-W Flat-Rite 
thinned same as for new wood and let 
dry. Where the new enamel finish is 
much hghter than the old surface, apply 
one coat of Flat-Rite mixed in equal parts 
with Enameloid in the color selected. 

When this is dry, sandpaper lightly to 
knock off "the nibs" and apply the 
finishing coat of Enameloid. 

Use S-W No. 208 Brush for larger sur- 
faces and No. 220 for small jobs. 



TO PAINT WOODWORK 
WITH SEMI-LUSTRE 

New Work: Thin Semi-Lustre with S-W 
Exolvent or pure turpentine (1 pint to the 
gallon). 

Second Coat : Use Semi-Lustre without 
thinning. 

Three Coat Work: Thin the secdnd coat 
same as the first coat and use Semi-Lustre 
without thinning for the third coat. 



OLD WORK — TO PAINT 
WITH SEMI-LUSTRE 

Wash the surface clean with S-W Flax- 
oap and water, rinse well,^ dry and 
sandpaper smooth. Then apply one or 
two coats of Semi-Lustre without thinning. 
Let the first coat dry over night, sand- 
paper lightly. 



[14] 



Our store is Sherwin-Williams Paint Headquarters 



THE 



RIGHT 



W A Y 



T O 



R E F I N I S H 



TO RE-VARNISH 
AN OLD FLOOR 

When the finish is merely soiled wash it 
thoroughly with S-W Flaxoap and water, 
rinse well and dry. Bare spots must be 
sandpapered and given a first coat of 
S-W Mar-Not Varnish with one pint of 
Exolvent or turpentine added to the 
gallon. Let dry and apply a coat of 
Mar-Not varnish as it comes in the can. 



* FLOORS * 



IMPORTANT: 




If the floor has been 
waxed — or if there 
is any doubt about 
it — wash carefully 
with turpentine 
before varnishj 
ing. Wax on the 
surface prevents 
varnish drying. 



A WORD ABOUT S-W 
MAR-NOT VARNISH 

Mar-Not dries in about 4 hours to an 
extremely tough, wear-resisting finish. 
It is excellent for floors because it does 
not chip, scratch white or discolor with 
either hot or cold water — no matter 
how long it is wet! 

Alcohol or ordinary acids do not harm 
Mar-Not. 



TO RESTORE AN 

OLD DISCOLORED FLOOR 

When either hardwood or softwood 
floors become badly discolored, var- 
nishing only serves to emphasize the 
imperfections. If the natural wood grain 
is to be preserved it is necessary to have 
the floors re-scraped. This expense is 
really worth while because the floor 



can then be finished exactly as good 
as new, following instructions on page 13. 

Softwood floors usually do not justify 
this expense and, frequently the owner 
wishes to finish floors with the least 
amount of trouble and expense. For 
such conditions the Flo-Lac Finishing 
System is particularly well suited. 

• 

TO REFINISH FLOORS 

WITH FLO-LAC 

Wash the floor with S-W Flaxoap and 
water rinsing with plenty of clear water. 
If there is any question about wax 
having been used on the floor, wash 
thoroughly with turpentine. Sandpaper 
rough spots diid scrape off all loose or 
scaly finish. 



A NEW FOUNDATION 

Apply two coats of Flo-Lac Ground Color. 
This hides the old surface and provides 
a clean new "wood color." 



A NEW GRAIN EFFECT 

Very attractive imitation grain effects 
are obtained by applying S-W Graining 
Preparation onto the ground color, 
when dry, working the wet graining 
colors, as you go, with graining tools 
or with an old worn whisk broom, 
depending upon the type of grain to 
be represented. 

When this is dry, one or two co'dts of 
Flo-Lac are applied in the color selected. 
Many people allow the first coat of Flo- 
Lac to set for a few minutes and then, 
by dragging a worn whisk broom 
through the varnish-stain a wavy grain 



effect is obtained without using any 
other graining preparations. 



S-W DEX LINOLEUM VARNISH 

Dex keeps linoleums looking new — it 
freshens up color and pattern of old 
linoleum. Dex seals the surface so that 
dirt does not penetrate, scrubbing is 
no longer necessary, dirt, grease and 
anything spilled wipe up easily. One 
quart of Dex will provide two coats for 
the average kitchen or will cover approx- 
imately 160 square feet, one coat. 



PREPARING LINOLEUM 
FOR VARNISHING 

Wash clean with S-W Flaxoap and water. 
Wash carefully with turpentine to re- 
move wax — new linoleum frequently 
comes waxed. 

Use a good varnish brush— S-W No. 208 
or 220. 

Two coals of Dex wiU wear more than 
twice as long as one coat. 




HOW TO WAX FLOORS 

A wax finish is always applied over a 
varnished finish or over shellac. It is 
not serviceable when applied direct to 
the wood without a protective finish. 

Use Sherwin-Williams Prepared Wax 
(paste). This spreads easily with a cloth 
pad and, when it has dried for a few 
minutes it is quickly brought to a full, 
rich polish with a soft dry cloth or a 
weighted waxer. 

• 

WAXING FLOORS 

WITHOUT RUBBING 

Use Sherwin-Williams Flo-Wax. This is 
made for use on linoleum or tile floors, 
also for all 
varnished 
floor s^but 
should not be 
applied to un- 
flnished wood 
as it contains 
water and 
would raise the 
grain. Simply 
apply Flo-Wax 
with a soft 
cloth or with 
the regular 
long-handled 
applicator and 
let dry — Flo- 
Wax is selfc- 
polishing. 



TO PAINT OR ENAMEL 
WOOD FLOORS 

Colored floors in Sherwin-Williams Floor 
Enamel are beautiful and make an 
excellent background for the furnishiligs 
of the room. Use Floor Enamel on wood, 
Unoleum or composition tile floors where 
the original finish cannot be renewed. 

Observe the usual precautions of wash- 




For best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



[15] 



Attractive effects are easily t>roduced on 
concrete floors by marking off squares and 
painting them with contrasting colors of 
S-W Floor Enamel 




ing, removing wax, etc. as outlined 
previously. Then apply two coats ot 
S-W Floor Enamel as directed on the can. 



TO ENAMEL CEMENT OR 
CONCRETE FLOORS 

CAUTION: Basement floors" which be- 
come wet periodically from moisture 
coming through the floor or the walls 
cannot be painted successfully — water 
will make the paint come oH. In a new 
building it vrill pay to wait a year to 
make certain the floors and walls are 
water-tight. This also permits the cement 
to "cure" thoroughly. In order to make 
certain there is no free alkali present, 
wet several spots on the floor. Let stand 
a few minutes and put a piece of red 
litmus paper on each spot (obtainable 
at the drug store). If this red litmus turns 
blue in a few minutes it indicates 
enough alkali present to aflect the paint. 
The remedy is to apply a wash made 
with 3 pounds of zinc sulphate to a 
gallon of water. Let this dry for several 
days, sweep out any remaining dry 
powder with a broom and then paint. 

Apply two or three coats, as required, 
of S-W Floor Enamel as directed on the 



Previously painted floors require only 
that the bare spots be touched up — then 
washed clean — any loose or scaly paint 
scraped oH and then painted vrith two 
coats of Floor Enamel as directed on 
the can. 




It is easier to make a straight edge wnen 
painting squares by using a sniall trim 
brush, S-W No. 400, guiding the brush with 
a yardstick. Then fill in squares with a 
large brush, S-W No. 212 or 9JXn 




When vrorking in "close quarters" a flot 
piece of tin or cardboard held against the 
wall will act as a shield. 



Waxing floor with 
pad made by wrap- 
ping cloth around 
^vood block. 
Polish with soft 
cloth. 




THE RIGHT WAY TO FINISH 

* FURNITURE * 




CAN A PERSON WITHOUT 
EXPERIENCE REFINISH 
FURNITURE? 

Yes! With a little patience and a willing- 
ness to follow directions and suggestions 
given in this book, the amateur can re- 
flnish furniture— beginning with the 
smaller pieces first — so that it will be 
both serviceable and enjoyable — and 
do it at a very small cost. 



WHAT FINISHES ARE BEST 
FOR FURNITURE? 

If you want to decorate or refinish the 
furniture in color, use Sherwin-Williams 
Enameloid or Rogers Brushing Lacquer. 

To restore the lustre to worn varnished 
furniture, re-coat it with Sherwin- 
Williams Mar-Not Varnish which wiU 
provide a fine new finish without 
changing the color. 

Stoined and varnished furniture that is 
faded can be freshened up in color or 



can be made darker to match walnut 
or mahogany by applying a coat or 
two of S-W Flo-Lac (stains and varnishes 
in one operation). 



SHOULD OLD FINISHES 
BE REMOVED ? 

If badly marred, checked or scaling, 
yes. Otherwise wash with S-W Flaxoap 
and water, dry and sandpaper to a 
uniform smooth, dull surface and then 
apply the finishing coats of varnish or 
enamel. 

When necessary to remove the old finish 
use S-W Taxite and follow directions on 
page 14. Then you are able to proceed 
as directed for new wood. 



CAN PAINT, VARNISH OR 
ENAMEL BE APPLIED OVER A 
WAXED FINISH ? 

No! The wax must be removed com- 
pletely by washing it off with turpentine. 
Wax interferes with the drying of other 
finishes. 




[16] 



Our store j? Sh^rwin-Williains Paint Headquarters 




WICKER FURNITURE CAN 
BE REFINISHED 

Use S-W Quick Drying Enameloid. Scrub 
the furniture clean with a scrubbing 
brush in gasoline — let dry. 

Thin Enameloid slightly with turpentine 
so that it will work into crevices freely. 
Apply with a rather thin brush which 
will be flexible enough to slip into the 
texture easily — a thick stubby brush 
would only hit the high spots. 



IS FINISHING NEW, UNFINISHED 
FURNITURE DIFFICULT? 

Not at all, there is an advantage in hav- 
ing a clean unfinished surface to start 
with. 

Remember that your finish can be no 
smoother than the surface over which it 
is applied. Sandpaper smooth, first with 
No. and then with No. 00 sandpaper, 
rubbing with the grain of the wood — 
never across the grain. 



Placepiece 
upside 
down on 
table and 
do lower 
part first. 




TO ENAMEL UNFINISHED 
FURNITURE 

Simple small pieces done in bright 
colors are easily finished by applying 
one or two coats of Enameloid. 

Larger pieces where a fine, porcelain- 
like finish is desired are finished as 
follows; 

First Coat: S-W Flat-Rite Enamel 
Undercoater thinned as directed on the 
can. 

Second Coat; An equal part mixture 
of Flat-Rite Undercoater and Enameloid 
in the color selected. 

Third Goat: Enameloid applied as it 
comes in the can. 

The first two coats should dry for a day 
and then be sandpapered lightly with 
No. 00 paper before applying the next 
coat. Use a No. 212 or 227 varnish or 
enamel brush. Remember that the more 
careful you ate in using a clean brush — 
in sandpapering the surface smooth — 
the finer will be the finish obtained. 



TRANSFER PATTERNS 

Decalcomania patterns are easy to apply 
and they add so much to the attractive- 
ness of tables, chairs and doors — <isk us 
about them. 



TO STAIN AND VARNISH 
NEW UNFINISHED FURNITURE 

This is done with Sherwin-Williams 
Woodcraft Stains and Mar-Not Varnish 
ad explained in detail on page 13 
under "Woodwork." 



SANDPAPER. 

When applying more than one coat of 
varnish, let dry 24 hours and sandpaper 
lightly between coats with No. 00 paper 
to dull gloss. Do not sandpaper the final 
coat. 




Apply Enamel- 
oid to spindles, 
legs, etc. by first 
brushing round 
and round using 
d soft brush. 
Finish nobs and 
small flutings in this some way, , scraping 
the brush £airly dry over "he edge o£ the can. 



Then finish the 
long stretches 
by stroking the 
long way. This 
is to pick up 
excess enamel 
and to cover 
any places 
missed. 



HOW TO APPLY A TRIM 
COLOR OR ENAMEL 

First do the entire piece in the principal 
color and let dry. Then take a small 
trimming brush and apply the accent 
colors to nobs, edges, etc. By having 
the rest of the enamel dry, any slips 
or mistakes can be corrected by wiping 
off the trim color with a cloth dampened 
with S-W Exolvent. 



At our store 
we can shovr 
you brushes 
which n\ake 
painting eas- 
ier and touch- 
up jobs real 
fun. 





IS THERE ANY ONE VARNISH 
FOR ALL PURPOSES? 

No, there is not. S-W Mar-Not Varnish is 
made for floors, woodwork and furniture. 
S-W Rexpar is made for all varnished 
surfaces exposed to weather, excessive 
moisture and direct sunlight. In addition 
to exterior surfaces it is the best varnish 
to use on interior window sills and sash. 



HOW TO PRODUCE WAX FINISH 

While Mar-Not varnished woodwork 
may be waxed very effectively, the so- 
called wax finish is produced as follows: 
Woodwork is first stained, then filled 
and then given two coats of thin pure 
white shellac. Then make one or two 
applications of S-W Prepared Paste 
Wax, bringing it to a polish by rubbing 
briskly with a soft cloth. 



HOW TO "DULL-RUB" A 
VARNISH FINISH 

After the varnish is both dry and hard 
{48 hours), rub it with powdered pumice 
and water or rubbing oil — a medium 
thin grade of motor oil will do. Make a 
rubbing block by nailing a piece of M 
inch felt around a flat block as illustrated. 
Wet the pad with oil, or water— not 
both. Then dip into saucer of pumice 
and rub the varnish with slow steady 
strokes, pressing not too hard, with the 
grain of the wood. Rub just sufficiently 
to cut the gloss to a uniform dull finish 
and wipe clean with a soft cloth. 




Tack felt onto block this way. 



For best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



[17] 



H 



H 



W 



I N 



WHEN IS THE BEST TIME 
FOR INTERIOR PAINTING ? 

The fine thing about interior painting is 
that it can be done at any lime, partic- 
ularly at times when it is impossible to 
do painting out of doors. 



KINDS OF WALLS SUITABLE 
FOR PAINTING 

There are five types of new walls found 
quite generally in homes today: 

SMOOTH PLASTER— putty coat finish 
is the commonest plaster wall found in 
homes because it permits either a painted 
finish or hanging of wall paper. 

SAND FINISH PLASTER— is not suitable 
for hanging wall paper but offers a most 
interesting surface for painting. 

TEXTURED PLASTER^rough troweled, 
also so-called Spanish textures cannot 
be papered but are particularly fine 
when painted. 

WALL BOARD— There are two general 
types — (1) standard hard boards; (2) 
thick, spongy insulating boards. These 
are most useful both for building new 
partitions and for resurfacing old walls. 
Wall boards can be painted very 
satisfactorily. 

WOOD WALLS— can be painted in 
various ways. Where joints are objec- 
tionable wood walls can be covered with 
wall board and painted. 



GENERAL NOTES: 

Do not paint new or "green" plaster as 
this invites trouble later with paint 
peeling. Allow new plaster to "cure" 
and dry for 30-60 days before painting 
— or finish vrith S-W Casenite. 



INTERIOR SURFACES 



* • 



REPAIRING CRACKS, 
DAMAGED WALLS 

Take time to repair plaster correctly. 
Cut out cracks with a knife, under- 
cutting the edge so that when filled with 
patching plaster the material will be 
held in place. Force this in with a putty 
knife and let dry for several days. Rough 
edges can be sandpapered smooth. 



WALL BOARD JOINTS 

After wall board is nailed into place, it 
is necessary to level off nail holes and 
fill cracks at joints. This work is done 
with s|}ecial patching plaster recom- 
mended for the purpose. It is done 
AFTER the first or PRIMING COAT has 
been applied to the wall. 



FIRST OR PRIMING COAT 

All wall surfaces are porous to a certain 
extent. Unless this is properly taken 
core of by applying the correct first 
coater, the wall dries out with a spottiness 
that cannot be overcome with additional 
coats of paint. 



ALL TYPES OF PLASTER — ALL 
TYPES OF WALL FINISHES 

All kinds of plaster are recommended to 
receive a first coat of Sherwin-Williams 
Wall Primer and Sealer. This same 
firstcoater is to be used no matter 
whether the wall is to be finished in 
Flat-Tone, Semi-Lustre or enamel finish. 



WALL BOARDS — TO PRIME 

Standard wall boards are also given a 
first coat of S-W Wall Primer and Sealer, 
Porous insulating type wall boards must 
be given a first coat of Sherwin-Williams 
Tri-Seal which is made for this special 
purpose. The use of any other type of 
first or priming coat simply results in 
point soaking into the board. 

Apply these firstcoaters with a S-W No. 
20 or a No. 40 Brush. 

Let dry for 24 hours before applying the 
next coat of paint. 



PREPARING OLD WALLS 
FOR PAINTING 

Walls previously painted with an oil 
paint should be washed with S-W flaxoap 
and water to remove all grease and dirt. 
This is particularly true of the kitchen 
where cooking deposits a film of grease 
which would interfere with the drying 
of the new paint unless removed. Do not 
be misled by kitchen walls which look 
clean — the grease may not show, but 
it's there and it will pay to wash it off 
with S-W Raxoap and water. 



OLD KALSOMINE 

Do not paint over kalsomine. Wash it 
off with a sponge and hot water. Let 
dry thoroughly then seal the surface vrith 
one coat of S-W Wall Primer and Sealer. 



WHAT ABOUT PAINTING 
OVER WALLPAPER ? 

Don't do it! Soak the wallpaper with hot 
water and scrape it off with a wide putty 
knife, taking care not to gouge or nick 
the plaster. Wash off the glue size, let 
dry thoroughly and apply one coat of 
S-W Wall Primer and Sealer. 




[18] 



Our store is Sherwin-Williams Paint Headqucirters 



OLD GLOSSY FINISHES 

Wash the old shiny wall with a good 
washing powder in the water to dull the 
gloss. Any shiny spots remaining should 
be sandpapered hghtly. This will result 
in the new finish going on with a much 
smoother and more opaque, hiding finish. 
Sandpapering takes 
but a few minutes but 
this simple operation 
eliminates trouble of 
chipping later on. 



To make a 
sanding block. 



To make a good sanding block for 
removing gloss from old paint, wrap six 
or eight thicknesses of cheese cloth 
around a flat block of wood aBouf 3x6 
inches and 2 inches thick. Tack the 
loose ends to the top of the block. Wrap 
the sandpoper around this holding it 
in place as you use it. 

Turn to Page 23 




THE IDEAL FINISH 




•^ ^ Ci 




Upper Lel(: CEILING AND V/ALLS, S-W Semi-Lustre Poudre Blue. 
TUB RECESS, S-W Semi-Lustre Canary Yellov/. WOODWORK, S-W 
Enameloid White trimmed with S-W Enameloid Black. 



Upper Right: CEILING AND WALLS, Semi-Lustre Cream. DADO 
AND WOODWORK, Enameloid Canary Yellow trimmed with Orange. 



Lower Right: CEILING AND WALL, Semi-Lustre Orchid. WOOD- 
WORK AND LOWER WALL, Enameloid White. FLOOR, Floor Enamel 
Gray Stone No. 356. 




FOR BATHROOMS 



» Semi-Lustre colors which are so lovely 
for your kitchen and bathroom walls have 
that satiny sheen that spells quality be- 
cause it is quality. 

Spread Semi-Lustre over the dingiest 
wall and the transformation is complete. 
The colors are "harmonized". They have 
been produced in Sherwin-Williams own 
Decorative Studios so that they will be cor- 
rect. Whether you select the Poudre Blue, 
the Orchid or a Canary Yellow you can 
feel that the final effect will be in good 
taste, just as if you had a Sherwin-Williams 
artist tint it specially for your home. 

The thoughtful housewife will never 
overlook the importance of the color of 
her towels in the bathroom. Yellow bath 
towels displayed so temptingly in their 
sanitary glass cases are the "hit" in our 
room of contrasts, above. They add 
just what is needed to set off the richness 
of the plum colored floor with its accent 
of black border and trim. The tub recess 
in Semi-Lustre Canary Yellow "just had 
to be", also. The shower curtain iP a 
light plum color and the window curtains 
a deep butter yellow. 

It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 



[19] 




(1) TABLE TOP, 
Enameloid Black. 
FRAME, Enameloid 
Color Mixture Olive 
trimmed with Enam- 
eloid Black and 
Orange, 



(2) Enameloid Chi- 
nese Red trimmed 
with Ivory. 



(3) Enameloid Jade. 



(4) Enameloid Pastel 
Blue. 



(5) Enameloid Ca- 
nary trimmed With 
Lettuce Green. 



(6) Enameloid Or- 
chid trimmed with 
Ivory and Milan 
Green. 



BRIGHT SPARKLING COLOR 



FOR FURNITURE AND TOYS 



» Until you try your hand with Sherwin-Williams 
quick drying Enameloid you'll never realize what 
miracles you can accomplish with color and brush. 
Odd pieces of furniture — a desk, bookcase, chair, 
table — a bit the worse for wear, will be your first 
opportunities because they serve such a useful pur- 
pose as color accent when placed along with the 
other furniture. 

MAKING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS 

» It never ceases to be a source of wonder as one 
discovers how a miscellaneous assortment of un- 
matched chairs, table and odds and ends can be 
done in a unifying color scheme in Enameloid and 
become as fine a set of recreation room furniture as 
one might wish for. Here, again, it is through the use 
of the same trim colors on all pieces which makes 
them seem to belong together. 

Look around your home now and imagine how 
much more attractive it will be when you replace the 
drabness of a bookrack, a small end table, umbrella 
stand, extra hall chair, settee or wicker piece in one 
of the lustrous color suggestions you will find in the 
Enameloid color card awaiting you here at our store. 

AND DON'T FORGET THE TOYS! 

Enameloid is "made to order" for toys. Its bril- 
liant hues, its hard drying finish and sturdy dura- 
bility will restore the kiddies' toys to favor and 
usefulness. 



It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 



NOW-A-DAYS 

» The up-to-date convenient kitchen has 
so many cupboards that there is often 
more woodwork than walls. Therefore we 
may Enameloid the door panels light — 
Ivory, Milan Green or Cream Gray and 
do the frames in a shade deeper such as 
Taupe, Lettuce or French Gray. Then a 
delightful accent of Orchid, Maroon or 
Blue on the narrow moulding around the 
panels and your kitchen is light, airy and 
happy. If windows are small or if a porch 
blocks out daylight, paint the ceiling in 
Semi-Lustre While or Ivory and the walls 
in sunny Canary Yellow. 

It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints, 

[21] 



n i l r' — . M T iM>' ^ w^nr*^— u <p 



S-W RAPID DRYING ENAMELOID 



FOR EVERY ROOM IN YOUR HOME 



» Have you ever been in a "natural 
pine" kitchen or where the wood had 
been stained and varnished until the 
general color was like an old tavern 
where you had to light a match to read 
the menu? Perhaps an exposed electric 
lamp hanging on a cord to make seeing 
a headache! How you would itch to get 
a bucket of Enameloid and "paint some 
light" into such a room, some sunshiny 
color and some happiness for the house- 
wife who must spend so many hours 
there preparing the "three-a-day." 







15^*' 



L S. 




Upper Right: WALLS AND CEILING, Semi-Lustre Poudre Blue. BASEBOARD 
Enameloid Pastel Blue. DOORS AND CABINETS, Enameloid Color Mixture 
French Gray and Ivory. DADO, Semi-Lustre Cream Gray. 



Lower Right: TUB ALCOVE, Enameloid Pastel Blue. WALLS, Semi-Lustre 
Orchid glazed with Oil Color English Rose Lake and a touch of Black WOOD- 
WORK AND DADO, Enameloid Platinum striped with Milan Green 



Upper Leit: KITCHEN CEILING, S-W Semi-Lustre Pale Green and White 
equal parts. WALL AND WOODWORK, S-W Semi-Lustre Canary YeUow,' 
Slencil border No. 29. 



Lower Left: BATHROOM CEILING, S-W Semi-Lustre Ivory White WALL 
S-W Semi-Lustre Orchid. WOOD TRIM, S-W Enameloid White. 




.-.^_ — 4 





'f^^t 




ABOUT BEDROOMS 



» The bedroom is above all a "personal" 
room. Its decoration should be intimate. Here, 
of all places in the world, you should feel at 
peace. Painted walls are peaceful backgrounds 
for the pictures and the trinkets, furniture and 
furnishings that you like to have near you. And 
in Flat- Tone Sherwin-Williams have put every- 
thing that makes such a wall beautiful and 
lastingly satisfactory. It has smoothness and a 
rich velvety appearance that makes any wall 
surface look better than you ever dreamed it 
could. We say "any" wall surface, because all 
bedrooms cannot boast of the best of plaster 
walls, by any means. Bedrooms are often par- 
titioned off with wall board or with wood walls 
and on these surfaces the dull velvety surface 
of Flat-Tone is particularly needed because a 
harsh, glossy paint would accentuate every im- 
perfection and result in a cheap, unattractive 
room where surely there could be httle peace 
and satisfaction. 



Upper Left: BEDROOM. CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone Ivory. WALLS, 
S-W Flat-Tone Sky Blue. Stencil No. 27. WOODWORK, S-W 
Enameloid Pastel Blue. FURNITURE, S-W Enameloid Platii^m. 



Lower Left: Flat-Tone Orchid invited quite an out-of-the-ordinary 
furnishing in maple stained to a mouse gray. WOODWORK' 
Enameloid Platinum, 



Lower Right: NURSERY. CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone Ivory. WALLS, 
S-W Flat-Tone Canary Yellow. WOODWORK, S-W Enapeloid 
Old Ivory. FLOOR, S-W Floor Enamel Mahogany. Stencil No. 158. 



It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 



[22] 



SCALED PAIKT 

If painf has scaled off leaving bare 
plaster, sandpaper down edges of tlie 
paint to make the spot less conspicuous. 
Then coajt in the bare spots with S-W 
Wall Primer and Sealer and let dry. 



WHAT IS THE BEST TYPE FINISH 
FOR A PLASTERED WALL ? 

An oil-base paint. It can be had in 
glossy, semi-gloss or dull (flat) finish. 
The choice is governed by the service 
the wall gets, also personal preference 
and decorative effect. 



FINISH KITCHENS, BATHROOMS, 
H ALLS,PL AYROOMS, LAUNDRY 
ROOM, ETC., WITH SHERWIN- 
WILLIAMS SEMI-LUSTRE 

In the past, it was considered neces- 
sary to paint these rooms in a glossy 
enaniel in order to make them 
washable. This is not necessary 
today, because S-W Semi -Lustre 
is so completely Wckshable and 
sanitary that it is the standard 
specification for hospital walls. 
Semi-Lustre has the special advan- 
tage of softer light diffusion than a 
shiny finish, hence a richer decor- 
ative wall and one easier on the eyes. 

Finger marks and grease from cooking 
are easily washed off Semi-Lustre walls. 
Even pencil marks, ink spots and mer- 




curochrome wash off clean. The house- 
wife can have complete confidence that 
her Semi-Lustre walls will not only give 
her a more attractively decorated 
kitchen or bath but that it will be an 
easy matter to keep them immaculate. 



HOW TO APPLY S-W 
SEMI-LUSTRE 



Spread the paint 
freely without 
too much brush- 
ing. 



^~" "/j 



Dip the brush 
about Vi the 
length of the 
bristles. 




Finish byatrok- 
ing lightly as 
illustrated. 



NEW UNPAINTED SURFACES 
FIRST COAT 

Apply one cbat of S-W Wall Primer and 
Sealer which will take care of the 
natural porosity of the wqll, prevent 
spottiness and hold out the coat of 
Semi-Lustre to a full beautiful finish 
that is perfectly washable. 



SECOND COAT 

Apply S-W Semi-Lustre as it comes in 
the can. 

These directions apply to a Semi-Lustre 
finish on wall board, brick and concrete 
walls, as well as plaster walls, EXCEP- 



TION: As stated previously, S-W Tri- 
Seal must be used as firstcoater on walls 
of porous insulating wall boards. 



OLD WORK 
FIRST COAT 

Apply S-W Wall Primer and Sealer to 
all bare spots and let dry. If the old 
finish is a flat wall paint, or if it is old 
and well worn with repeated washing, 
it is recommended that a general first 
coat of Wall Primer ond Sealer — to 
which has been added 2 quarts of Semi- 
Lustre to the gallon — be applied to the 
entire wall surface. Let dry over night 
before repainting. 



SECOND COAT 

Apply S-W Semi-Lustre as it comes in 
the can. NOTE: If three coats are 
planned, add one pint of S-W Exolvent 
or turpentine to each gallon of Semi- 
Lustre for the second coat and apply the 
third coat just as the paint comes in 
the can. 



WHAT BRUSH TO USE FOR 
APPLYING SEMI-LUSTRE 

Although Semi-Lustre has an enamel- 
like finish it brushes as easily as a wall 
paint. Therefore a 3 or 4 inch S-W No. 
20 or No. 40 Brush is recommended. 



USE GOOD PAINT-HIRE A 
GOOD PAINTER 

We consider that the proper paint- 
ing, enameling and decorating of 
the kitchen will be more satisfactory 
when done by a reliable painter. 
Realizing however, that circum- 
stances sometimes do not permit 
engaging a painter, also that the 
painting of Semi-Lustre in small 
hallways and stairways is a strictly 
"utility" job where the home owner 
likes to exercise his own skill, the 



following suggestions are offered 
to help obtain better finished walls. 



HOW TO BRUSH WALL PAINT 
ON LARGE SURFACES 

Dipping brush no more than \i the 
length of the bristle and keeping it well 
scraped on the edge of the can helps 
keep paint from running down arms 
when painting ceilings. 

Apply paint in strips 2 to 3 feet wide 
using a rather full brush. Do not brush 
out too much. 

Smooth out lightly with fan-shape, 
semi-circular brush strokes. 



PAINTING LIVING ROOM, DIN- 
ING ROOM, BEDROOM WALLS 
AND CEILINGS. 

There are several reasons why S-W 
flat-Tone is the paint of our recom- 
mendation. It is a superb decorative 
finish with a velvety appearance that 
makes a better background for room 
furnishings than a glossy finish. Flat- 
Tone diffuses light more effectively, 
also, so that Rat-Tone walls make more 
enjoyable rooms with greater degree of 
eye comfort. And, finally, Flat-Tone 
with its soft, dull finish improves the 
appearance of all types of walls^ 
whether rough or smooth — new and 
perfect or old and patched. 

Sand finish plaster, canvased or burlap 
walls or the many rough textured plaster 
effects all take on added beauty when 
coated vrith Flat-Tone. In fact, such 
textures are so interesting that several 
methods are offered to make ordinary 
smooth plastered walls look as if they 
were rough textured. 



PRINTED OR PATTERNED 
WALL EFFECTS 

If you want a wall which looks rich and 
smooth and which is smooth to the 



For best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



[23] 



touch, Beautiful Flat-Tone tints will give 
it to you. 

If you want a wall finish that is patterned 
and looks rough, but still is smooth to 
the touch and easily dusted or washed, 
Flat-Tone sponge stippled with con- 
trasting colors of Flat-Tone, offers one 
very beautiful type of wall finish. Flat- 
Tone glazed and stippled in textured 
tiffany finishes provides another ex- 
ceedingly rich and attractive wall effect. 

There is a most practical advantage 
possessed by these textured Flat-Tone 
finishes, namely their ability to make 
patches and other wail imperfections 
inconspicuous. 



FIRST COAT ON NEW 
UNPAINTED WALLS 

As previously explained, successful 
painting of new plaster walls is accom- 
pUshed by first taking care of natural 
porosity by applying a first coat of S-W 
Wall Primer and Sealer. This may be 
tinted with oil color to match the color 
of Flat-Tone to follow, if desired, and will 
assist in producing a finer, richer finish. 
Let dry over night. Wall Primer and 
Sealer will seal the most porous plaster 
effectively. But where smooth plaster is 
particularly hard and troweled to a 
tight glaze, the addition of 2 quarts of 
Rat-Tone to each gallon of the primer 
is recommended. 



Wall Primer and Sealer to the first Coat 
of Blat-Tone. Apply the second coat as 
it comes in the can. 



WHAT TYPE OF BRUSH FOR 
FLAT-TONE? 

Use S-W Brush No. 20 or No. 40 in 3 J^ 
or 4 inch width. Apply the paint freely 
without brushing more than necessary. 
Finish the surface with fan-like strokes 
as illustrated on page 23 undet Semi- 
Lustre. 



HOW TO GET SPONGE STIPPLE 
EFFECTS WITH FLAT-TONE 

First point the wall in a plain color of 
Flat-Tone following the directions just 
given. In Paint Headquarters Store you 
can select the effect which appeals to 
you from the large Decorative counter 
book. You brush on the color specified 
as the background. 

The colbrs specified as stipple colors 
are then prepared and stirred r-eady 
for use. These colors are printed onto 
the wall background color using a 
sponge to make the pattern or print. 

In selecting the sponge, choose one 
which has good even texture on the 
bottom as this is the '*printing'\surface. 
The sponge is washed out in water and 
used quite damp so as to keep it soft 
and pliable. 



SECOND COAT -NEW WORK 

Use Flat-Tone in the desired color as it 
comes in the can. 

• 

FLAT-TONE FOR REPAINTING 

OLD SURFACES 

Frequently a wall finished in good oil 
paint will be found to be in condition 
lor repainting with Flat-Tone after only 
a washing with soap and water. Hov/- 
ever, when there is any doubt about it 
the safer course is to add two quarts of 

[241 



APPLYING THE STIPPLE COLOR 

Pour out some of the Flat-Tone stipple 




Pour some Flat- 
ToneStipple color 
onto a newspaper 
— rub sponge into 
this. 




color onto a newspaper and rub the 
bottom of the sponge into this pool of 
paint — do not dip the sponge into the 
can of paint. See that the sponge is well 
covered with Flat-Tone. Tap onto the 
paper several times to distribute any 
excess paint. 

Now pattern the wall by tapping the 
loaded sponge directly onto the back- 
around color. Place each sponge print 



Tapping loaded 
sponge directly 
onto Flat-Tone 
background. Do 
not twist sponge. 



next to, and slightly overlapping the 
preceding one. Continue to re-load the 
sponge after every few prints and 
proceed to cover the entire wall surface 
in this manner. 



HOW TO SECURE TEXTURED 
TIFFANY EFFECT WITH 
FLAT-TONE 

These finishes, produced over a solid 
background color of Flat-Tone, Semi- 
Lustre or Enameloid may range from 
the softest blended antique ivory clear 
down through to the richest imaginable 
"stained glass" effect. 

S-W Glazing Liquid produces the deep, 
transparent effect which makes these 
finishes so rich. This Uquid is tinted to 
the desired color with S-W First Quality 
Oil Colors. 

Use S-W First Quality Oil Colors 
£or tiriting the Glazing Liquid. This 
results in beautiful, deep trans- 
parent effects whereas when paint 
is used for tinting, an opaque effect 
is secured. 

First apply a coat of clear untinted 
Glazing Liquid. 

The tinted Glazing Liquid is then brushed 
onto the background color and im- 



mediately stippled vrith a brush, a 
crumpled cloth, newspaper or brush- 
marked according to the textiire desired. 
At Paint Headquarters store the Decor- 
ative counter book shows many different 
stipple textures and colpr cornbinations 
in textured tiffany glaze from which 
you can make your selection. 

The distinctive feature of S-W Glazing 
Liquid is that it will take and hold any 
desired print so that the wall may be 
made to have a great deal of visible 
texture and yet be perfectly smooth to 
the touch and — of course, readily 
washable. 




When using stip- 
pUngbrush, pounce 
straight onto wall. 
Improper sliding of 
stippling brush re- 
sults in streaks. 

Holding cloth 
crumpled with 
many wrinkles to 



Cloth held in a 
tight smooth pad 
does not produce 
a good print when 
stippling. 



Apply Tinted 
Glozing Ijiquid 
with a brush. 





Our store is Sherwin-Williams Paint Headquarters 



■P 




Upper section shows poor effect resulting 
from stippling .with tight wad of cloth. 
Lower portion shows "prints" produced 
with crumpled cloth. 



HOW TO SECURE 
ACTUAL TEXTURE 
IN PAINTED WALLS 

Actual raised texture can be produced 
over smooth plaster by applying Sherwin- 
Williams wall paints and stippling or 
manipulating them in various ways. 

(1) For Fine Pebbled Texture Flat- 
Tone is pounced with a stippling 
brush. The wall receives a first coat 
o£ Wall Primer and Sealer, as for 
regular work. This is allowed to dry 
over night and a coat of Flat-Tone 
is applied in the regular way, except 
that a heavier coat is brushed on 
and, after spreading about 10 square 
feet the wet paint is pounced with 
a painter's stippling brush. 

This eliminates all brushmarks and the 
finish obtained is much more pleasing 
than the plain smooth surface. Stippling 
in this manner does not harm the 
fine washability of Plat- Tone in 
the least. 

(2) For More Pronounced Texture 
use S-W Wall Paint No. 96. This is 
applied over the usual first coat of 
Wall Primer and Sealer. Although it 
comes in extremely heavy con- 
sistency, there is no difficulty in 
spreading it with a regular 4-inch 
wall brush. 



In applying Wo. 96 Wall Paint, lay the 
paint on in short strokes using a full 
brush and more or less "trowel" it on 
with the brush. It will be "full of 
brush marks," as it should be to 
enable you to produce a texture on 
the surface. In fact, a most at- 
tractive effect is obtained by brush- 
ing on the point writh fan-shaped 
strokes (see illustration on page 23) 
and letting the paint dry this way. 



LET THE PAINT SET 
FOR FEW MINUTES 

If a proper, heavy coating of No. 96 
Wall Paint has been appUed, it should 
be allowed to "set" for a lew minutes 
before stippling so that whatever texture 
is impressed upon it will remain distinct 
and not "flow back." 



"Troweling" heavy body wall paint with 
a wood block. 




Other tools used in making wall textures 
in No. 96 Wall Paint are: a steel graining 
comb or an old worn whisk broom which 
wiU result in a grass-cloth texture when 
dragged through the wet-painted sur- 
face. A 4" X 6" wood block can be 
troweled through the wet paint to 
produce innumerable effects. 





Combing heavy body wall paint with a 
steel graining comb. 



S-W CASENITE 
Washable Wafer Paint • 

A marvelous new development in water 
paint. One coat covers solidly and it is 
washable. Casenite can be applied 
without first sizing the wall, except on 
extremely porous surfaces where it is 
advisable to apply a thin sealing coat 
of Casenite before the finishing coat is 
brushed on. Casenite is not a kalsomine 
but a high quality product readUy 
mixed by adding liike-warm water as 
directed on the package. 

The washability of Casenite cannot be 
compared with that of S-W Semi-Lustre, 
of course. However dirt marks can be 
sponged off readily, which is something 
which no kalsomine vrill permit. It is 
advisable to avoid washing until the 
finish has dried 60 to 90 days on the 
surface. It does not rub off on the 
clothes. 



S-W KALSO 
,Ho( Water Wall Finish 

This perfected Hot Water Wall Finish 
differs from Decotint in that it requires 
hot water for mixing. Kalso comes in 
white and in eight delicate tints. It is a 
superior finely miUed product and 
covers slightly more surface per pound 
than Decotint. It should be applied over 
a properly sized surface. 



WATER 
PAINTS 



S-W DECOTINT 

Hoi or Cold Water Wall Finish 

This is an economical wall finish for 
interior use. It comes in white and 
fourteen tints which give that soft, 
velvety water-color effect that many 
prefer. It can be applied to any paintable 
interior wall surface and is easily made 
ready for use by simply adding either 
hot or cold water according to instruc- 
tions on the package. One pound will 
cover from 60 to 80 square feet when 
mixed. It should be applied over a sur- 
face which has been properly sized. 



BONDING CEMENT PAINT 

S-W Bonding Cement Paint actually is 
an artificial stone in powder form which 
bonds with the surface, sets like cement 
and becomes an integral part of the 
surface to which it is applied. 

Bonding Cement Paint is intended for 
use on unpointed stucco, concrete, brick 
and stone surfaces. It is necessary that 
the surface have sufficient porosity to 
permit the paint to secure proper bond. 
Only one coat is required on most 
surfaces. 

Five pounds of Bonding Cement Point 
will make approximately one gallon of 
paint when water has been added 
according to directions. This amount 
of paint will cover 150 to 200 square feet 
of average surface. 



For best results yse Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



[25] 



H 



H 



W 



I N 



HOUSE PAINTING— 

HOW OFTEN? 

The frequency with which your house 
needs repainting depends upon three 
things: 1. Local climatic conditions. 
2. The quality and the color of the paint 
used. 3. The skill with which it is opphed. 

You can control the quality and the 
color of the point by using proved- 
quality SWP house paint. You can con- 
trol the skill with which the painting is 
done by hiring a reliable master painter 
— but you can't control weather — hence 
no hard-and-fast rule can be .given 
when you should repaint your house. 
Under average conditions, however, a 
house painted by a reliable master 
painter using SWP House Paint vrill last 
five years or longer. 

• 

REPAINTING FOR PROTECTION 

A coat of paint is like the bark on the 
tree — remove the bark and the tree dies. 
When the paint wears off, water seeps in, 
decay sets in, nails rust and loosen. Soon 
there is a good sized repair bill. Then 
after repairs are made the job is com- 
pleted by painting. Timely painting 
removes the cause of practically all such 
repair bills. 

• 

FOR APPEARANCE'S SAKE 

The fine appearance of your home has a 
definite value. You can't afford to have 
a shabby looking house. As necessary as 



EXTERIOR SURFACES 









h. 


-^■^H*_I»|— BfjnjHB — ^Blm 1^ 1 ^m 


^1 






^^?L 1 



Neglected painting produces results like this. 



painting for protection undoubtedly is, 
it is even more important in relation to 
your standing in your community. 

• 

WHAT SEASON IS BEST FOR 

OUTSIDE PAINTING? 

While the correct answer depends upon 
where you live, the time of year is not as 
important as the kind of weather. It is 
better to be guided by the- following 
rather than by the season of the year: 

1. On new buildings, allow the sun to 
dry the lumber thoroughly before paint- 

ing. The wood 
must be dry clear 
through — not 
merely "surface 
dry.'' This is 
equally true of old 
buildings which 
have been ex- 
posed to wet 
weather. 

2. Never paint a wet surface — the paint 
is likely to peel later. Avoid painting on 
cold, damp days — also during blistering 
hot weather. Don't paint over frosted 
surfaces. 

3. Paint when the weather is warm and 
dry — when the air is free from dust and 
insects — and when there is least danger 
from sudden rainstorms. Paint when the 
temperature is between S0° and 85 
if possible. 

• 

HOW TO SELECT THE COLORS 

BEST SUITED TO YOUR HOUSE 

Light tints make a house appear larger. 
Dark shades, also neutral grays make it 
seem smaller. Following Nature's ex- 




ample the smaller house should be 
painted in the lighter, brighter tints 
while the large building should be done 
in the darker, more neutral shades, 
particularly in a group of other buildings. 
When the large house has spacious 
grounds vrith trees and shrubbery it, 
too, can be painted in brighter Unts. 

For the house that appears too large, use 
a moderately light tint for the body and 
trim with a dark color. 

A tall, narrow house appears lower when 
the upper body and roof are in consider- 
ably darker colors than the lower part. 
Avoid trimming vertical lines, such as 
corner boards. For the house that cannot 
be well divided in this way, use a neutral 
color for the entire body, trimming sash 
in a light color. 

For the house that looks squatty, use a 
neutral color, emphasize vertical lines 
when trimming and keep the roof light. 

Do not use house paint for the porch 
floors and steps. These require a special 
wear-resisting paint. When porch ceil- 
ings are painted use White or a light 
tint because it not only makes a lighter 
porch but reflects light into adjoining 
rooms, as well. 



HOW MANY COATS FOR A 
GOOD PAINT JOB? 

Two coats are always recommended to 
repaint houses when the normal period 
of four or five years has elapsed since 
the previous painting. On new buildings, 
being painted for the first time, three 
coats are strongly advised as most 
economical. 



There are some who advocate applying 
one coat of paint every three years. The 
fault in this practice is that a weathered 
painted surface calls for a priming coat 
to prepare it for the second coat which 
must present a full, impervious film 
capable of resisting weather and the 
penetration of moisture. A single coat 
applied over an unprepared surface 
is robbed of such a part of its oil that 
it no longer presents the best possible 
paint protection. Consult a reliable 
painter about your house if you are in 
doubt. 



HOW MANY GALLONS OF 
PAINT WILL BE NEEDED FOR 
YOUR HOUSE? 

This depends not only upon the size of 
the house but also the brand of paint 
used. Some brands will take as much as 
twelve gallons for the average house 
which can be painted with only seven 
gallons of SWP. You have the right to 
expect this greater coverage when you 
use SWP because SWP is all paint. There 
are no adulterants or water to rob the 
paint of its spread or its hiding power. 
Then, too, SWP is ground to the ideal 
consistency required by the painter to 
spread paint over the greatest surface 
area and still obtain a uniform, long 
wearing coating. 



HOW TO ESTIMATE THE 
QUANTITY OF SWP REQUIRED 

Measure the distance around the house 
and multiply this figure by the average 
height of the building. 

Divide this figure by 400 wh^ch is the 
number of square feet SWP will cover 
per gallon, two coats, under average 
conditions. 

This will give the number of gallons of 



[26] 



Our store is Sherwin-Williams Paint Headquarters 



SWP needed for the body of the house. 
For the trim, cornices, porch pillars, etc., 
about one-eighth to one-fifth as much 
paint will be required, depending upon 
the style of the house, the amount of 
trim, etc. 

For porch floors — see page 30. 



SOME VALUABLE 
PAINTING HINTS 



NEW BUILDINGS 

When a new house is built, the wood 
siding should be primed promptly to 
protect it from rain and hot sun and 
prevent warping and splitting. Finishing 
coats, however, should not be applied 
until after the plaster has dried com- 
pletely, because much of this moisture 
escapes through the outside walls. This 
is especially true during cold-weather 
building when rooms are heated to dry 
the plaster. Painting before both lumber 
and plaster are thoroughly dry has 
been the cause of much paint peeling. 

New stucco houses should be permitted 
to "cure" for at least 6 months before 
painting the stucco. 

Knots and streaks should be covered 
with orange shellac before priming. 
This prevents rosin from exuding and 
discoloring the paint. 

Nailholes and cracks should be puttied 
ajter the priming coat. CAREFUL 
PUTTYING IS MOST IMPORTANT. 




OLD WORK — RE-PAINTING 

Be sure that the old surface is in the 
right condition for painting. If the old 
paint is cracking or peehng, have the 
painter burn it off with a blow torch. 
All loose paint must be removed either 
by scraping vrith a putty knife or with a 
wire brush. Cobwebs, dust, soot and all 
other foreign matter should be brushed 
off vrith a painter's duster. Wash grease 
spots off with painter's naphtha. 

"Chalking" paint which is smooth, 
though gradually dusting away, does 
not have to be removed. In fact, paint 
that is moderately worn forms a good 
foundation for new paint. Glossy areas 
under eaves, porches, etc., where chalk- 
ing has not started, should be sand- 
papered lightly to avoid paint "crawling." 

Badly weathered sash require a priming 
coat of SWP House Paint, thinned ac- 
cording to directions on the package. 
Brush well into the wood and, when dry, 
putty should be worked into the cracks. 

Downspouts and gutters must be cleaned 
out. Remove rust with a wire brush and 
paint the inside with Sherwin-Williams 
Ebonol Roof Paint. If rusted through, 
holes which are not too large can be 
patched with S-W Elastic Roof Cement 
(paste). Outside of gutters should be 
painted with SWP same color as the 
trim. For best results on metal down- 
spouts and outside of gutters apply a 
first coat of S-W Golvanoz, a galvanized 
iron primer. 



painting the body of the house. Details 
on staining shingles and painting other 
type roofs on page 28. 



Bend shrubbery and vines back from the 
house and cover thenrv with a tarpaulin to 
protect them from paint and, also, to keep 
them £ron\ rubbing the new paint. 



CHECK THE ROOF 

Replace missing shingles, cement brick 
joints around chimney flashings. Repair 
flashings with either S-W Liquid or 
Elastic Roof Cement, as required (see 
details on page 29). Leaks are respon- 
sible for paint peeling and other damage 
— many times in places remote from the 
actual leak. 

Have the roof stained or painted before 




REMOVE SHUTTERS. These ore re -painted 
every couple of seasons and should be 
token down, cleaned and pointed aw<^ 
from Ihe house. 



ADVANTAGES IN USING SWP 
READY-MIXED PAINT 

SWP is a complete paint. It contains 
all necessary ingredients ready-mixed 
in the can. Every can is correct in color 
and in consistency, filled and sealed in 
the Sherwin-Williams Laboratories. SWP 
is made rich and full in body, however, 
so as to permit the painter to modify it 
vrith linseed oil or turpentine to suit the 
requirements of each surface. <No other 
thinners should ever be added.) Com- 
plete thinning instructions are always 
found on every can of SWP. 



USING SWP HOUSE PAINT 

When the top is removed from a can 
of SWP it will be noticed that the oil has 
risen to the top. This is natural and does 
not indicate anything wrong with the 
paint. 

Pour off the surface oil into a clean can. 
Then stir the remaining paste until it is 
perfectly smooth and even. Begin return- 
ing the oil into the paint a little at a time 
stirring constantly. When all the oil is 
back and the paint thoroughly stirred, 
then pour it back and forth from one 
pail into another eight or ten times to 
make the mixture uniform. 



THE MASTER PAINTER 

The services o£ a good, reliable 
painter are always recommended 
by Sherwin-Williams when it comes 
to painting the house. Too much is 
involved in the protection of prop- 
erty from decay to warrant taking 
any chances. You will be money 
ahead when you secure the best 
possible paint and hire the best 
available painter to apply it. 

There are occasions when the owner 
wishes to point a small outbuilding 
himself and the suggestions which follow 
are designed to help him secure best 
possible results. 

Work the paint into the surface so that 
it wiU dry to a firm, solid coating, well 
anchored to the surface. Too thick a 
coat never dries properly. It remains 
soft imdemeath, wrinkles and is likely 
to peel. 

Consult the chart on the label of the can 
telling how to thin SWP for different 
types of surfaces — also how to thin SWP 
for 1st, 2nd and 3rd coats. Properly 
thinned, the paint will look better, wear 
better and cost the least when thinning 
instructions are observed carefully. 



WORK ON THE SHADY SIDE 

Don't apply paint in the hot sun — also 
do not apply it on the shady side if the 
surface is wet with rain or with dew or 
frost. Wait until the surface is dry. * 




Always use a good 
clean brush. 

Dip the brush into the paint about K to H 
the length of the bristles. 



Fop best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



[27] 



Allow the priming coat to dry hard 
before applying the second coat. During 
normal weather it wiU be ready for the 
second coat in 48-72 hours. 

On 3 coat work the second coat may 
require from 4 to 6 days before applying 
the final coat. 



ABOUT BRUSHES 




No. 10 



No. 40 



No. 400 



IMPORTANCE OF THE 
PRIMING COAT 

The priming coat is the important coat 
because the finish coat can be no better 
than the foundation coat permits it to be. 
You will notice that your painter adds 
linseed oil or turpentine — or both — to 
the SWP house paint for the first coat. 
This is to adjust it to the porosity of the 
surface and this adjustment should vary, 
the south and west sides oi the building, 
as a rule, requiring the addition of more 
linseed oil than the north and east — also 
the non-chalking sections under the 
eaves, etc., the use of less oil and more 
turpentine. 



A good painter uses good tools as well 
as good paint. In fact, a good brush is 
fully as important as good paint. A 
coarse, stubby brush can't possibly 
spread house paint to a uniform coating 
that will be durable. It will result in a 
dauby appearance, full of brushmarks, 
"hills and valleys." Every "valley" 
where the point is thin represents a weak 
spot where weather will break down 
the paint, ruining its appearance and 
destroying its protective value. 

Ask Paint Headquarters to tell you how to 
take care of brushes and how to clean 
them — it pays. 

There is a quality brush for every 
purpose. You can save money and do a 
better job if you use the three sizes of 
brushes Illustrated above. A 4-inch S-W 
No. 10 or 20 brush is recommended 
for larger areas, a 2i4-inch S-W No. 40 
for trimming and a longhandled S-W 
No. 400 brush for painting the sash and 
other small trim surfaces. 



OTHER NECESSARY TOOLS 

Other tools needed in connection with 
painting are: a good putty knife, a 
painter's dusting brush, several sheets 
of No. 3^ sandpaper, a clean paddle for 
stirring paint, sufficient high quality 
linseed oil and turpentine. These are all 
items to get at Paint Headquarters Store 
where you will be certain of their quality. 







/ 


w 




^ 


/ - 


' iT^^^^^ 


-^%v- 




^^ / 




/ 



Work house paint into the surface well, 
by brushing right and left with the brush 
BCant full. 



STAINING WOOD SHINGLES 

Use Sherwin-Williams Preservative 
Shingle Stains. They stain the wood, 
bringing out its beauty vrithout conceal- 
ing the grain. Made with refined creosote 
these stains prevent the formation of 
fungus growrth and are effective against 
wood boring insects. 



S-W SHINGLE STAINS DO NOT 
CONTAMINATE RAIN WATER 

After the stain has been applied to the 
roof, allow the first few rains to run off 
until unpleasant taste disappears. This 
appUes to all shingle stains — but with 
some makes, rain water can never be 
used from the roof where they are used. 
S-W Stains are not injurious to the 
health. 



DIPPING NEW WOOD SHINGLES 

New shingles come boSh stained and 
unstained. Unstained shingles should be 
dipped before laying. 




Dip the thick end into the dipping vat, 
73 the length of the shingle. 

All the cans of stain for the entire job 
should be emptied together into one 
large vat or tub and stirred thoroughly 
before and during use. 

Do not soak the shingles — dip quickly in 
and out, Y^ the length of the shingle. 
Set into a trough draining back into the 
tub for a few minutes then throw into a 
loose pile on the ground to dry until 
the next day. 



ALSO ONE BRUSH COAT 

The first coat is dipped to secure com- 
plete covering of both sides, ends and 
edges. The second coat is brushed on 
after the shingles are on the house. 
This "uniforms" the surface and takes 
care of edges exposed in cutting and 
laying the shingles. The first coat is used 
without thinning. The second coat 
should be thinned with 1 pint Unseed oil 
to each gallon of stain — particularly 
when shingle stain is brushed over old 
weathered shingles. 

For brushing large surfaces use S-W 
Brush No. 5 or No. 10 in the 4I2- or 5- 
inch width. For small jobs, use S-W 
Brush No. 20, 30 or No. 75. 



HOW TO GET NEW COLOR ON 
AN OLD ROOF 

If you wish to brighten up the roof color 
apply one or two coals ol a lighter shade 
because stains do not hide like paint and 
a dark surface will cause the stain to 
dry darker than shown on the color 
card. For dry, weathered shingles add 
Yi gallon of linseed oil to each gallon of 
stain. 

When a dark roof is to be made light or 
when a change of color is wanted which 
a stain won't produce, SWP House 
Paint is recommended, thinning the 
paint as directed on the label or on the 
color card. 



HOW MUCH STAIN 
WILL you NEED? 

One gallon of Sherwin-Williams Pre- 
servative Shingle Stain will cover ap- 
proximately one hundred square feet, 
one dip and one brush coat or 150 
square feet one coat, brushed on. Two 
and one-half to three-fourths gallons will 
dip 1000 shingles, one coat. Some 
shingles take more stain than others, due 
to varying characteristics of the wood, 
also whether it is rough sawn or smooth. 

CAUTION: New shingles which have 
been exposed to weather and are water 
soaked should be unbound and spread 
out to dry before staining. 

• 

TO PAINT METAL ROOFS 

Scrape off rust with a wire brush and 
apply a first coat of Sherwin-Williams 
Kromik Metal Primer. On galvanized 
iron roofs the first coat should be S-W 
Galvanox. After letting the priming 
coat dry 24 to 36 hours under normal 
conditions apply a finishing coat of S-W 
Metalastic, which may be had in Green, 
Gray, Brown and Black. 

S-W Kromik Metal Primer is an outstand- 
ing paint for all metal surfaces except 



[28] 



Our store is Sherwin-Willismns Paint Headquarters 



galvanized iron. It costs less than red 
lead paint, works easier, prevents cor- 
rosion and forms a water-tight fUm not 
readily affected by sulphur fumes in 
the air. A gallon of Kromik will cover 
about 800 square feet of metal, one coat. 

S-W Metalastic is a combination graph- 
ite type paint ground in refined linseed 
oil. It is used both as a priming and a 
finishing coat but Sherwin-Williams 
standard specifications call for Priming 
Coat of Kromik Metal Primer and fin- 
ishing coat of Metalastic, which com- 
bination gives best possible protection 
to metal and is specified the world over 
for bridges and steel structures of all 
kinds. 

On large surfaces apply with S-W No. 10 
or 20 Brush. Use S-W No. 82 Brush for 
small jobs. 



ROOF AND BRIDGE PAINT 

For a lower priced but dependable 
roof paint use S-W Roof and Bridge 
Paint. It covers about 500 square feet 
of average surface per gallon, one 
coat. 

Use S-W No. 10 or 20 Brush for large 
surfaces ; No. 82 Brush for small jobs. 



TO PAINT SHINGLE ROOFS 

S-W Roof and Bridge Paint is ex- 
cellent for this purpose. Where the 
shingles or other wood surfaces to be 
painted are dry and weatherbeaten, 
add }^ gallon of linseed oil to each 
gallon of paint for the first or prim- 
ing coat. For the second coat, add 
one quart raw linseed oil to each 
gallon. 



TO WATERPROOF AND 
RESTORE COMPOSITION ROOFS 

Apply one or two coats of S-W Ebonol — a 
black, acid-jree coal tar base paint — to 
old dried out composition roofing. Ebonol 
will prevent new composition roofing 




from drying and 
cracking. 



Brush Ebonol over 
metal Qashings and 
inside of gutters 
to prevent rust. 



If the composition 
roof is in bad shape proceed as follows: 

Use S-W Elastic Roof Cement (paste) to 
fill holes. Then, after priming the old 
roofing with Ebonol apply an all-over 
coat of S-W Liquid Hoof Cement using a 
3 knot roofing brush for large areas. 
Before doing any painting sweep off all 
dirt, gravel or debris with a stiff broom. 
A flat roof coated with Liquid Roof 
Cement may be graveled if desired — 
recommended where roof is walked on. 
Ebonol will cover 100 to 200 square feet 
one coat per gallon depending upon the 
condition of the roof. 

Liquid Roof Cement covers 40 to 100 
square feet per gallon depending upon 
the surface and how heavily it is applied. 



HOW TO PATCH HOLES IN 
GUTTERS, DOWNSPOUTS, ETC. 

Use Sherwin-Williams Elastic Roof 
Cement. This comes in paste form to be 
spread with a trowel. It contains long- 
fibre asbestos to increase its toughness. 
Even fairly large holes can usually be 
mended with a sheet of can tin cemented 





Apply Liquid Roof 
Cement with a 3 
knot roofing brush. 



S-W Roof Cements come in Red and Green 
as well as black. They contain long fibre 
asbestos to make them tough and non- 
cracking. 

in place with S-W Elastic Roof Cement. 
First be sure that the surface is free from 
dirt, grease and rust so that cement can 
adhere. 

100 pounds of Elastic Roof Cement will 
cover about 250 square feet of smooth 
surface with a coating 1/16 of an inch 
thick. 



Apply Elastic Roof Cement with a trowel. 



SHOULD A STUCCO HOUSE 
BE PAINTED? 

Yes— and only an oil paint con make it 
truly water proof! During wet weather, 
unpointed porous stucco absorbs a 
tremendous amount of water. Result — a 
damp house — difficult to heat — unhealth- 
ful and uncomfortable. This dampness 
coming through walls often ruins interior 
decorations and causes wood structure 
to decay. 



HOW ABOUT PAINTING OLD 
BRICK HOUSES OR CONCRETE 
STRUCTURES ? 

Old brick buildings often look dingy and 
drab. Soot and grime accumulate and 
cling to their rough, porous surfaces. 
Old brick will often absorb as much as 
18% of its weight in water! Old brick 
homes, school buildings, industrial 
plants, concrete buildings, etc., show 
amazing improvement when properly 
painted. 



USE S-W STUCCO AND CON- 
CRETE PAINT ON STUCCO, BRICK 
AND CONCRETE BUILDINGS 

Sherwin-Williams Stucco and Concrete 
Paint is a waterproofing oil paint made 
expressly for the purpose. It comes in 
the characteristic colors which are so 
attractive for stucco, brick and concrete 
houses. Avoid flashy colors. Stucco and 
Concrete Paint is a durable, lasting 
finish and is ever so much more satis- 
factory to use than the ordinary "lime 
washes" which afford no protection 
against moisture and which are usually 
found "on the ground" after the first 
rainstorm. 

S-W Stucco and Concrete Paint vnll 
cover about 150 square feet per gallon, 
one coat, depending upon the roughness 
and porosity of the surface. To estimate 
the amount of paint required, follow the 
same instructions given for estimating 
on page 26. 



HOW TO PREPARE STUCCO AND 
CONCRETE FOR PAINTING 

Remove any cold water finish, dust, soot, 
etc. Use a stiff broom or a fibre brush. 
Wash off grease spots with benzine. 
Often there will be a salty-looking sub- 
stance on the surface. Scrape or brush 
this off. Then wash the surface with a 
solution made with 3 pounds zinc sul- 
phate to the gallon of water. Allow this 
to dry 24 to 48 hours; then paint. * 

First Coat: Mix Stucco and Concrete 
Paint equal parts with S-W Stucco and 
Concrete Mixing Sealer. Do not sub- 
stitute Unseed oil, turpentine or any other 
thinner for this purpose. Use a S-W No. 5 
or No. 10 metal bound brush or a No. 110 
leather bound brush. 

A 

Second Coat: Use S-W Stucco and 
Concrete Paint without thinning. Work 
the paint well into the texture of the 
surface. Allow four days for the first 
coat to dry before repainting. 



For best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 



(29] 



HOW TO PAINT BRICK HOUSES 

Brush the surface clean of all dust and 
loose particles of mortar. Point up any 
bad joints and let the mortar dry for 
about a week before painting. 

Apply two coats of S-W Stucco and 
Concrete Paint following the same 
directions as for stucco surfaces. 




If you paint mortar joints white or black, 
as is often done on brick houses, except 
those painted all-over white, use a S-W 
Brick Liner brush No. 1040 which has a 
good, clean-cut straight edge. Do not try 
to follow the joints free hand — use a yard 
stick or ruler to guide your brush. 



WHAT ABOUT PORCH FLOORS? 

Is house paint suitable to use on porch 
floors and steps? The answer is no. Porch 
floors and steps need a finish that dries 
to a hard, smooth, tough, "traffic-proof" 
water-tight film. 

Use Sherwin-Williams Porch and Deck 
Paint for finishing porches and steps of 
both wood and concrete. It is easy to 
apply, dries over night to walk on and 
covers 250 square feel per gallon, 2 
coats. It comes in six practical, attractive 
colors. Apply with S-W No. 20 Brush for 
large surfaces; No. 40 or No. 60 for 
small jobs. 



HOW TO APPLY PORCH AND 
DECK PAINT 

Old Work, Wood or Concrete: Scrape 
off all loose or scaly paint. It's a good 
idea to wipe off the entire porch surface 
with a clean cloth or mop dampened 
with gasoline. S-W Flaxoap and water 
can be used, but time must then be 
allowed for the floor to dry thoroughly, 



before painting, particularly if there are 
bare spots where the wood is exposed. 
Also take care to rinse off all trace of 
soap with plenty of warm clean water. 

If the paint has worn through in spots so 
that the wood is bare, sandpaper these — 
and all places where the paint may have 
scaled off — and touch up with S-W 
Porch and Deck Paint thinned with one 
pint linseed oil and one pint S-W Exol- 
vent or turpentine to the gallon. Let these 
spots dry for 8 hours before repainting. 
Fill all cracks with S-W Crack and Seam 
filler worked in firmly with a putty knife. 

For the finishing coat apply Porch and 
Deck Paint without thinning. Spread it 
with a full brush working the paint well 
into all cracks, etc. Finish a strip of 
about six boards width, working length- 
wise of the boards. 

Note : If the old surface is badly weather- 
beaten and worn, give the entire surface 
a priming coat thinned as directed 
above. Let dry over.» night and apply a 
second coat without thinning. 



NEW WORK: WOOD 
OR CONCRETE 

Thin the First Coat with one pint linseed 
oil and one pint S-W Exolvent or turpen- 
tine to each gallon of paint. Second Coat: 
Thin each gallon of Porch and Deck 
Paint with ]/i pint of S-W Exolvent or 
turpentine. Third Coat: Use the paint 
as 'it comes, without thinning. 



HOW TO TELL WHEN CONCRETE 
FLOOR IS DRY ENOUGH TO 
PAINT 

Lay a piece of linoleum 3 or 4 feet square 
on the floor. If, after two days no damp- 
ness shows under it, it is dry enough 
to point. 

• 

WHAT PAINT TO USE ON 

PORCH CEILING 

Porch ceilings painted in white or light 



tints of SWP House Paint will reflect 
light into adjoining rooms. Follow 
directions for thinning on the can. 



TO VARNISH PORCH CEILING 

Be certain that the wood, when new, is 
sandpapered clean — no fingermarks or 
dirt spots. If already varnished, wash 
clean with soap and water. Use Sherwin- 
Williams Rexpar Varnish. It produces a 
finish that does not discolor with water 
or crack with hot or cold weather. 
Rexpar is easy to apply, it dries dust-free 
in three to four hours — can be re-coated 
in eight hours — is pale in color and does 
not darken the wood. 

Note: Do not brush out varnish as you 
would house paint. See suggestions on 
page 13. 



HOW TO PAINT SCREENS 

The best time to do this is before putting 
them up in the spring or before putting 
them away in the fall. Use Sherwrin- 
WilUams Screen Enamel — Black or 
Green. No trick at all to use it — does 
not clog the mesh — prevents rusting of 
the wire and warping of the frame. One 
coat is sufficient. Use screen enamel 
application on a S-W No. 231 Brush. 
Dries in 4 to 6 hours. 

If the screen has rusty spots, wash off 
with gasoline before painting. Lay the 
screen down on a newspaper on a table 
and rub the gasoline, dirt and rust out 
with a cloth. 



ONE QUART OF SCREEN 
ENAMEL IS ENOUGH FOR THE 
SCREENS OF AVERAGE SIZE 
HOUSE 

Paint the screen mesh first — the frame 
last. Go over the mesh, first one side, 
then the other, with a brush sparingly 
filled. Pick up any excess enamel with 



the brush which has been wiped dry 
over the edge of the paint can. 

Copper or bronze screens should be 
protected with a coat of S-W Rexpar 
Varnish to prevent corroding of the wire 
and discoloring of the house by the 
resultant green slain washing over it. 

The frames of screens should be painted 
to prevent warping and splitting. Use 
Screen Enamel or SWP. Cottages are 
attractive with S-W Bright Trim Colors 
on frames of screens. 



WHAT PAINT TO USE ON 
BARNS, CRIBS, WOOD FENCES, 
ETC. 

For these and similar painting jobs use 
Sherwin-Williams Commonwealth Barn 
Red and Barn Gray. This paint is de- 
signed to do the best job possible in one 
coat on average outbuilding surfaces, 
two coats on very porous, weathered 
surfaces. A most economical paint to 
use both because of its modest price and 
its excellent durability. 

Prepare surfaces in the same manner as 
directed for painting the house — extra 
care makes better looking buildings. 
Estimate gallons needed on a basis of 
500 square feet per gallon, one coat. 
When thinning is necessary, use pure 
linseed oil. Over new, unpainted wood 
or porous surfaces, a liberal addition of 
linseed oil takes care of durability, 

FOR CONCRETE SILOS — use 

Sherwin-Williams Stucco and Ccfncrete 
Paint as directed for stucco houses on 
page 29. 



FOR METAL FENCES, METAL 
BUILDINGS, ROOFS OF OUT- 
BUILDINGS, ETC. 

Use S-W Roof and Bridge Paint, Remove 
any loose paint with a wire brush. Use 
a small S-W No. 405 Brush for painting 
metal fences; for roofs and large sur- 
faces S-W No. 10 Brush. 



[30] 



For best results use Good Paint and hire a Good Painter 







Painting by liockwcll Kent 



Above: CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone Ivory. WALLS, S-W Flat- 
Tone Cream Gray and Shell Pink equal parts. 



Right: CEILING, Flat-Tone Ivory. WALL, Flat-Tone Pale 
Green. FLOOR, Floor Enamel Walnut Brown No. 480. 
WOODWORK, Enameloid Lettuce. 



TO PROMOTE TIDINESS 



» Paint is a great promoter of tidiness. Its 
spic and span newness furnishes the incen- 
tive to be neat. But, particularly, it brightens 
dark corners and halls, closets and storage 
rooms that are inadequately lighted. Who is 
there who wouldn't enjoy hanging clothes in 
a colorful painted closet — and wouldn't shoes 
be put away cleaner and in neater order on 
clean enameled shoe racks? 

Closets are small enclosures. Make them 
brilliantly colorful. Canary Yellow Flat-Tone 
walls with clothes hangers and other acces- 
sories done in Enameloid Jade and Black is 
one suggestion. Poudre Blue Flat-Tone walls 
with accessories in Enameloid Apricot and 
Ivory is another pleasing color scheme. It is 
most effective to contrast the color of the closet 
to the general color scheme of the bedroom, 
also to do the inside of the closet door in this 
contrasting color. 



Come to our store for information about Sherwin-Williams Products. 



31] 





Above: BODY TRIM AND 
SASH, SWP Canary Yel- 
low 387. ROOF, S-W 
Shingle Stain Sienna Brown 
B-41. SHUTTERS, SWP 
Willow Green 461. 

Right: ROOF, Preservative 
Shingle Slain Medium 
Green C-74. BODY, Pre- 
servative Shingle Stain Nut 
Brown, B-47; or SWP 499 
Antique Brown. TRIM AND 
SASH, SWP Canary Yellow 
387. 



Come to our store for 

information about 

Sherwin-Williams 

Products. 



MAKING YOUR HOUSE 



A HOME 



» To be a home owner is a privilege not 
measured alone by the ability to pay for 
it. Neighborhoods of home owners are for- 
ward looking people who are willing to 
sacrifice other things, if need be, to assure 
the perpetuation of a more beautiful home. 

Your home is the most significant visible 
expression of your personal tastes and its 
appearance cannot be slighted. You 
wouldn't knowingly jeopardize the safety 
of the home and its family by permitting 
the fire insurance to lapse for even a day. 
And yet there are millions of homes in our 
country today where insurance has been 
permitted to lapse — the painting insur- 
ance. Fire is at its worst but a one-in-a- 
hundred-thousand hazard against which 
we omit no precaution. But Dtecay through 
lack of painting is a 100% hazard as cer- 
tain as the proverbial death and taxes! 

Good paint, like good insurance, is the 
only kind deserving your consideration. 
When choosing house paint exercise the 
same cautious consideration that you would 
give any other major purchase. Actual 
service on buildings leaves no room for 
doubt that the better the quality of paint 
used, the less it costs in the long run. Is 
your home properly protected with paint- 
ing insurance? 



[32] 



WHY NOT TAKE A LESSON 



FROM INDUSTRY . . . 



» It is significant that industrial companies who 
purchase paint on a technical or engineering 
basis specify ready-mixed paint for every use — 
on interior and exterior surfaces and on the 
painted products made in their factories. 

Your refrigerator, your automobile, your type- 
writer and everything made, with its perfect 
factory finish is painted with a laboratory-mixed, 
multi-pigment paint — mixed and ground at the 





paint factory and made for its exact purpose. No 
guess work is tolerated here. The job of checking 
the performance of various types of paint is 
definitely assigned to men who are trained for 
this work. For painting buildings the same SWP 
House Paint is specified by them as is sold in this 
store for the protection of your home. 



Above: UPPER BODY, SWP Ivory No. 496. LOWER BODY, Stucco 
and Concrete Paint Cream Gray. ROOF, Thatch Brown Shingle 
Stain B-46. SHUTTERS, SWP Moss Green No. 498. 



Lett: ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle Stain Thatch Brown B-46. 
SHUTTERS, SWP House Paint Moss Green No. 498. BODY, SWP 
House Pain! Outside Gloss White. 



It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 



[33] 




SWP HOUSE PAINT 



IS LABORATORY MIXED 



» Sherwin-Williams SWP House Paint is a 
factory made precision product as accu- 
rately manufactured as a watch. In SWP 
several pigments are combined to give it 
greater resistance to weather, a more solid 
hiding film and a superlative beauty of fin- 
ish, year after year on your house. Finest 
white lead, made in Sherwin-Williams own 
plants is reinforced with OZLO, an exclusive 
Sherwin-Williams development v/herein 
pure white lead is brought into chemical 
union with zinc oxide that you may have a 
more lasting protective film to guard your 
house against damage from decay. SWP 
paint makers employ the same principles 
which put reinforcing in concrete, extra 
plies in tires and special wear resisting 
treads to grip the road. 



Upper Left: CEILING AND TRIM, S-W Trimbrite Verdas 
Green, WALLS, SWP Antique Brown No. 499. FLOOR, 
S-W Poich and Deck Paint Tile Red No. 46. 



Lower Left: ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle Stain Sienna 
Brown B-41. BODY, SWP Quaker Drab No. 391. TRIM, 
Shutters and Sash, SWP Modern Brown No. 388. 



Upper Right: BODY, SWP Cream Gray No. 360. TRIM, 
SWP Outside Gloss White. SHUTTERS, SWP Straw No. 
385. FLOOR, S-W Porch and Deck Paint, Gray Stone 
No. 48. FURNITURE, S-W Enameloid Blue. 



Lower Right: ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle Stain, 
Sienna Brown B-41. BODY, TRIM, AND SASH, SWP Out- 
side Gloss White, SHUTTERS, S-W Trimbrite Spanish Blue. 



It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 

[34] - 




m 



j:g:a>]fji:iq 



COLORS 



THE WHITE 

» Nowhere is there a more beautiful White than 
in SWP. So gleaming on the house and so defiant 
of weather. Its smoothness, so porcelain-like, does 
not roughen up on exposure. Its reinforcement with 
pigments which resist action of sulphurous gases 
keeps SWP whiter, so that washing with soap and 
water makes it look like a new paint job after the 
winter's grime. 

COLORS 

» We invite you to see the SWP color card in our 
store. Come in and see how true to character they 
are; the yellows, the lovely grays, the browns and 
the greens, just made for the shutters on some 
grand old colonial home. These SWP colors have 
a way of keeping their freshness due to the rein- 
forcing of the pigments already mentioned and 
also because of the purity and fastness to light of 
the tinting colors employed. These, too, are made 
in Sherwin-Williams own color plant — the same 
plant where colors are produced for automobiles, 
for postage stamps and for printing inks. 

SWP colors are standard the world over. No 
matter where you live, or where you buy a can'^of 
SWP the colors are tinted with engineering exact- 
ness to match the correct standard. Their beauty is 
to be depended upon, in any climate, in any land. 



Upper: THE COTTAGE HOME. ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle 
Sfain Thatch Brown No. B-46. BODY, SWP Canary Yellov/ No, 387. 
SHUTTERS, SWP French Crown Green Med. No. 362. TRIM, SWP 
Outside Gloss White. 



Lower: ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle Stain mixture of equal 
parts Thatch Brown B-46 and Silver Gray C-82. BODY, S-W Pre- 
servative Shingle Stain Silver Gray C-82 or SWP Light Lead No. 353. 
TRIM, SASH, SHUTTERS, SWP Ivory No. 496. 



35] 




BODY, Sherwin-Williams Stucco and Concrete Paint Can- 
ary Yellow, or White glazed with Raw Linseed Oil and Drier 
tinted in two batches with S-W First Quality Oil Colors Raw 
Sienna and Chrome Green Medium. SHUTTERS, S-W 
Trimbrite Verdas Green. 



[36] 



A LASTING BEAUTY TREATMEN 



FOR STUCCO AND BRICK HOUSES 



» Yes — stucco houses should be painted. But it is a 
waste of time and money to coat them with Hme washes. 
These soon wash off— and afford no protection while 
they do last. 

» Stucco is often very porous and absorbs a great deal 
of moisture— during a driving rain water seeps through 
into the supporting structure resulting in damp-rot, also 
causing cracks to appear. Often it soaks clear through 
into interior plastered walls— making ugly streaks and 
sometimes causing the plaster to fall. This condition 
naturally means a damp, unhealthful house— extremely 
difficult and expensive to heat. 

» S-W Stucco and Concrete Paint is an oil paint which 
produces a smooth, tight coating that keeps water out 
of stucco, prevents ugly cracks (except those which 
result from settHng) and "Keeps its face clean." The 
beauty of a stucco house is in large areas of pleasing 

color. (Continued on Page 37) 

Come to our store for information about Sherwin-Williams Products. 




» When these areas are painted with 
S-W Stucco and Concrete Paint — they stay 
pleasing. Dirt and soot wash off with each 
rain instead of streaking. 

» Stucco and Concrete Paint comes in eight 
beautiful stucco colors, some of which are 
shown on these two pages. 



Upper: BODY, S-W Stucco and Concrete Paint Coral Tint. 
DOOR AND SASH, S-W Trimbrite Verdas Green. 



Lower Left; BODY, S-W Stucco and Concrete Paint Canary 
Yellow, TRIM, S-W Trimbrite Verdas Green Light. 



Lower Right tBrick House); ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle 
Stain Thatch Brown B-46. BODY, Stucco and Concrete Paint 
White. TRIM, SWP Tobacco Brown No. 393. 



It costs less to use Sherwin-Williams Paints. 





WHEN FRIENDS DROP IN TO SEE YOU 



» No need to emphasize the value of first impressions. The hall is the first 
thing your friends see inside the home. It must be bright and cheery colors 
to make up for any dimness of daylight. 

Here's a glimpse into a breakfast room that will be recalled with delight 

— fresh piquant color, vibrant with white 

woodwork and furniture. 

And for the informality of the friendly 
game — your basement recreation room done 
in sunny yellow offers a light hearted back- 
ground that is particularly appropriate. 




Left: HALL CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone Ivory. WALLS, S-W Flat-Tone 
Caen Stone. WOODWORK, S-W Enoraeloid Old Ivoiy and White 
mixed, equal parts. FLOOR, S-W Mar-not Varnish. 



Right: CEILING, Serai-Lustre Ivory White. WALLS, Canary Yel- 
low. FLOOR, Floor Enamel Walnut Brown. DOORS AND WOOD- 
WORK, Enameloid Taupe. 



Center: CEILING, S-W Flat-Tone White. WALLS, S-W 
Flat-Tone V/hite glazed with SW Glazing Liquid tinted 
with a mixture of S-W First Quality Oil Colors Chrome 
Yellow Light and touch of Chrome Green Light. WOOD- 
WORK, S-W Enameloid White FLOOR, S-W Floor 
Enamel Mahogany. 



Come to our store for information about Sherwin-Williams Products. 



[38] 





FARM PAINTING 



» A bam painted like this in S-W Common- 
wealth Barn Red is a mark of distinction. It 
is an evidence of thrift, good sound business 
judgment and an appreciation of the value 
of good appearance. Your neighbors pay 
you a comphment when they talk about the 
way you keep your buildings well painted! 
And it pays to earn the reputation for hav- 
ing the best painted equipment, loo. S-W 
Wagon and Implement Paint is an enamel 
finish designed to be used on all your mo- 
bile equipment, also pumps, tractor, etc. 



^"»^PI1I1IU|||| 
I- pr t.'! 



Above: BARN ROOF, S-W Ebonol. BODY 
COLOR, S-W Commonweallh Barn Red. TRIM 
COLOR, SWP House Paint Outside Gloss White. 
HOUSE ROOF, S-W Preservative Shingle Stain, 
Medium Green No. C-74. BODY COLOR, SWP 
House Paint Outside Gloss White. 



Right: CEILING, S-W Rexpar Varnish. WALLS, 
S-W Stucco and Concrete Paint Canary Yellow. 
TBIM, SWP Outside Gloss White. FLOOR, S-W 
Porch and Deck Paint Neutral Brown No. 45. 





a word 
about the 
Master 
Painter 



» Many of the suggestions and ideas in this book 
can be worked out by the property owner himself 
— or herself. Satisfactory results can be had by the 
novice in painting chairs, small tables, cupboards, 
odd pieces of furniture, toys, porch furniture and 
small objects in and about the home. 

But when it comes to the larger surfaces — the 
house exterior, the interior walls, ceilings, roofs, 
floors, etc., best results are usually had by con- 
sulting a master painter. 



The Sign on 

the store where 

you get better 

Paint Service " 

[39] 




H. S. BILLINGTON 



"In the Beautiful Mohawk Valley" 
Phone: 303 Canajoharie, N. Y.